Confidence building consultants http://coberm.net/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 07:06:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://coberm.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13-120x120.png Confidence building consultants http://coberm.net/ 32 32 Police barracks to be razed for $3 billion Women’s and Children’s Hospital https://coberm.net/police-barracks-to-be-razed-for-3-billion-womens-and-childrens-hospital/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 02:54:05 +0000 https://coberm.net/police-barracks-to-be-razed-for-3-billion-womens-and-childrens-hospital/ The state-owned Thebarton Police Barracks will be bulldozed to make way for a new women’s and children’s hospital, with the cost of the project rocketing by a billion dollars and the opening date pushed back to 2030-31, the government announced. Rendering of the proposed new Women’s and Children’s Hospital, on the site of the present […]]]>

The state-owned Thebarton Police Barracks will be bulldozed to make way for a new women’s and children’s hospital, with the cost of the project rocketing by a billion dollars and the opening date pushed back to 2030-31, the government announced.

The state government this morning revealed the location and design of the proposed new hospital after reporting on Monday evening that it had decided not to build any further on the site of the previously proposed rail yards immediately west of the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH).

Health Minister Chris Picton did not respond to questions from InDaily yesterday afternoon following a state cabinet meeting, but at a press conference this morning he said the government had chosen to abandon the previously proposed train station site because it was too small, had no room for expansion and would force the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit to be disjointed from other care services.

He said the government had instead decided to bulldoze 10 buildings of the state heritage listed Thebarton Police Barracks adjacent to Bonython Park and build a nine to 10 storey women’s and children’s hospital.

It follows a review by former State Coordinator General Jim Hallion, who considered six potential locations within the city’s West Biomedical Compound.

This review revealed that the 20,000 square meter barracks site is twice as large as the marshalling yard site and would allow the government to build a larger hospital with 56 additional beds and “built-in capacity” for 20 additional beds, taking the total capacity of the proposed hospital. to 414 beds – 76 more than the existing hospital in North Adelaide.

The government says the barracks site would also allow it to increase treatment space by 24 per cent over the existing North Adelaide hospital and build a co-located four-bed women’s intensive care unit with the pediatric intensive care unit.

“At the end of the day, we want this to be a world-class hospital…and we want to get it right from the start,” Picton said.

Construction of the hospital at the barracks would involve the demolition of 10 police buildings – some of which date back to 1917 and were added to the state heritage list in 1985.

The Police Barracks currently houses the South African Police Mounted Police and Canine Operations Units, as well as the South African Police Museum.

InDaily has contacted South African police for comment.

“By choosing to build on the site of the barracks, we are leaving room for the future expansion of the RAH and we are leaving room for the future expansion of women and children,” Premier Peter Malinauskas said.

“Building on the site of Thebarton Barracks also means we can build a bigger hospital on the first try.

“This hospital will be much larger than the previous plan.”

The government says the cost of the hospital has risen from the previous estimate of $1.95 billion to between $3 billion and $3.2 billion, with the increase partly due to the election pledge of $150 million. dollars from the Labor Party to build 50 more beds and increase parking and construction costs. increasing by $1,475 per square meter.

That compares to the $2.3 billion cost of the new RAH, which would have been Australia’s most expensive building when it opened in 2017.

The cost estimate is based on three reviews by independent cost consultants Rider Levett Bucknall, management contractors Lendlease and former NSW Health Infrastructure CEO Sam Sangster.

According to the government, keeping the hospital on the site of the previous rail yard would have cost $2.8 billion, a cost explosion of $850 million from previous estimates.

Rendering of the proposed new Women’s and Children’s Hospital (top center). Image courtesy of the state government

The planned opening of the hospital has also been pushed back to 2030-31 – about three years later than the 2027 date announced by the former Marshall government. Early work is expected to begin next year before construction begins in early 2024.

Prime Minister Peter Malinauskas has said the government will introduce special legislation this year to speed up the planning process to allow it to be built more quickly, warning that without it the opening date could blow up.

He said the legislation would “enable us to continue with the task of getting construction started as quickly as possible.”

“If we get this legislation through Parliament, the likelihood of achieving the 2031 timetable increases dramatically and, in turn, that actually represents a better outcome for taxpayers as well, because with each passing month the cost of escalation becomes higher,” he said.

The Women’s and Children’s Hospital Alliance backs the new plans, with spokesperson Professor Warren Jones – a retired obstetrician – telling InDaily the barracks site was a better location than the previous plan.

“While this is a small compromise on the need to merge women and motherhood directly with the RAH, it is feasible and safe,” he said.

“I accept that this is the only viable option to keep the WCH in close proximity to the RAH.

“Other options are too complex, structurally or functionally impractical, and prohibitively expensive.”

Leading obstetrician and gynecologist Professor John Svigos described the new plan as an “excellent compromise that will work”.

“But, it will take extraordinary energy and genuine commitment from all parties – government, clinicians, paramedics, support staff, including volunteers and public and private charities – to create a world-class institution that will serve women and the children of this state for many decades,” he said.

“Serious aggression”: the head of heritage sounds the alarm

Thebarton Police Station. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

Although clinicians welcomed the government’s announcement, SA Heritage Council chairman Keith Conlon warned of the ramifications of demolishing a state heritage site.

“I will stand before the bulldozers,” he wrote in an opinion piece published in Daily.

“They will destroy a collection of buildings that have been listed as state heritage sites because they gave us a tangible connection to a crucial part of our past and how we got here.

“Worse still, the government will also destroy any certainty about heritage protection in South Australia.”

Part of the historic Thebarton Barracks complex. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

Thebarton Police Barracks is located on previously vacant park land and was donated to the South African Police in 1917, with construction of the original buildings completed that year.

According to the SA Police Historical Society, the site is an “important facility for a wide range of policing functions in the provision of policing services to the South Australian community”.

“May the barracks continue for another 100 years,” the company’s website reads.

InDaily contacted the company for comment.

The State Heritage List is granted to places that contribute to the architectural, social, technological, or scientific history of the state and affords listed buildings special protection under the Heritage Places Act.

Barton Barracks. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

Conlon, who oversees the independent body that administers the law, said his “confidence in the government’s approach to heritage has been shattered”.

“If you thought the previous government’s land claim on the railway line to mount a multi-storey car park in national heritage park lands was a leap too far, then you will be stunned by this serious assault on a state heritage district,” he said.

MLC Greens Robert Simms said the new plans showed “an alarming lack of imagination”.

“South Australians shouldn’t have to choose between a new hospital and our iconic buildings and Park Lands. Surely the government can find another site or alternatives that do not result in the destruction of much of our city’s heritage,” he said.

“This whole process mocks our state’s heritage protection process.”

Prime Minister Peter Malinauskas acknowledged heritage concerns at the site, but said it was ‘not Bonython Hall’.

“I don’t think there is any doubt that the politically easiest and most expedient option for the government would have been to proceed with the construction of the new women’s and children’s hospital on the previously proposed site,” he said. he declared.

“Politically it would be easier to build the new WCH immediately west of the RAH, but the long-term consequences of this policy would be profound.

“It is not an easy judgment to make to build the new WCH on what is currently the site of Thebarton Barracks. The Thebarton Barracks site is heritage listed. This heritage list applies to 10 buildings on the site.

Malinauskas said the site’s heritage status “is more a function of it being an early police barracks…rather than being a building of extraordinary architectural significance.”

“Thebarton Police Station is not Bonython Hall. It’s not a beautiful, iconic building on North Terrace,” he said.

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Pitlochry: McKays Hotel owners Richard Drummond and Jon Erasmus invest for growth https://coberm.net/pitlochry-mckays-hotel-owners-richard-drummond-and-jon-erasmus-invest-for-growth/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 04:00:04 +0000 https://coberm.net/pitlochry-mckays-hotel-owners-richard-drummond-and-jon-erasmus-invest-for-growth/ The owners of a hotel in Highland Perthshire have unveiled a new £1.25million development, underlining their belief that ‘dynamism will return to the Scottish tourism market after Covid’. The McKays Hotel in Pitlochry, owned by the J and R Group vehicle of hoteliers Richard Drummond and Jon Erasmus, has seen the addition of 12 new […]]]>

The owners of a hotel in Highland Perthshire have unveiled a new £1.25million development, underlining their belief that ‘dynamism will return to the Scottish tourism market after Covid’.

The McKays Hotel in Pitlochry, owned by the J and R Group vehicle of hoteliers Richard Drummond and Jon Erasmus, has seen the addition of 12 new contemporary bedrooms and the creation of a ‘reimagined functional 100-seat suite’.

The latest investment, made possible by corporate and bank funding, brings J and R Group’s investment in McKays to around £3 million and increases the number of rooms to 39.

READ MORE: Ian McConnell: Jacob Rees-Mogg quits unnecessary role in fascinating nomination by Truss

Hotel owners noted the cost pressures facing the sector, but stressed their confidence in the outlook.

They said construction was undertaken as a “live project” by construction firm Dundee Alpha Projects, who worked alongside architectural and design consultants Dave Phillip and Steve Gibson.

This allowed McKays to continue trading as work progressed during the busy summer months.

Development had been funded before the coronavirus pandemic but had to be halted due to shutdowns.

READ MORE: Ian McConnell: The good, the bad and the ugly of Truss & Co

Mr. Drummond said: “We have confidence in what we have created here as a product. Our approach has been to continually reinvest in the business, to improve quality for customers. We increased our sales during the last financial crash of 2007/2008 and have grown the business since then. This gave the bank confidence in us as operators and they also saw the impact when we started to grow our portfolio of rooms.

“We are a hotel, restaurant and bar. We also support live music across Scotland and local artists through things like the boutique music festival ‘March Into Pitlochry’. When customers come here, they come for a number of different reasons. We sincerely believe that we offer something that not all hotels have.

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Architect – New York, NY, USA | Works https://coberm.net/architect-new-york-ny-usa-works/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 13:30:44 +0000 https://coberm.net/architect-new-york-ny-usa-works/ DVLPR is looking for highly motivated architects with strong design talent who are interested in innovative and concept-driven solutions. We are looking for Design Architects with experience in all phases to assist in the design, development and production of all necessary documents, drawings, models and images related to the architectural process. The ideal candidate should […]]]>

DVLPR is looking for highly motivated architects with strong design talent who are interested in innovative and concept-driven solutions.

We are looking for Design Architects with experience in all phases to assist in the design, development and production of all necessary documents, drawings, models and images related to the architectural process. The ideal candidate should be interested in joining a small business and participating in its growth as we explore exceptional opportunities.

Current works include an artist studio building, an art gallery building renovation, residential projects and exhibitions.

ARCHITECT

  • Professional or graduate degree in architecture
  • Minimum 5 years of experience in an architectural office
  • Strong conceptual, graphic and design skills exemplified in a comprehensive portfolio
  • Strong skills in AutoCAD, 3D Max, Rhino, Adobe Suite
  • Strong rendering skills
  • Experience working on complex projects in all phases
  • Confidence to work collaboratively in a dynamic and international environment
  • Proficiency in spoken and written English
  • Ability to assist in the production and development of all documents, drawings, models, images, diagrams, etc. necessary related to the design and construction process
  • Experience working in construction documentation phases, (technical) details, sourcing project-related materials and solving complex problems at all scales
  • Fundamental understanding of the design process and ability to create stunning architectural designs and translate them into actual construction projects
  • Ability to liaise with consultants to evaluate design solutions and ensure integrity of final design
  • Good interpersonal and communication skills, and ability to work well in a team
  • Being licensed to practice architecture in the United States (or in the process of obtaining a license) is a plus

DVLPR (pronounced developer) is a design studio committed to a proactive role for architectural practice. The studio’s portfolio encompasses a wide range of cultural, residential and commercial projects, including exhibition design, artist support, scenography and activism. For several years, culminating in 2022, the studio worked closely with Sub in Berlin on the global rebranding of Balenciaga’s architectural campaign and set design for Paris fashion week. DVLPR regularly works at the intersection of art and architecture and has done important cultural projects with artists and institutions such as Kevin Beasley at the Whitney Museum of American Art and Cady Noland at the Museum für Moderne Kunst. More recently, the studio completed a major commission with artist Timur Si-Qin at Meta’s new headquarters in New York.

More information about DVLPR here https://archinect.com/dvlpr

Please submit a PDF of your portfolio, CV and cover letter to dvlpr@dvlpr.info with Intermediate Architect in the subject line.


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Back to task list…

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Marcos’ team wants to eliminate the POGOs. Here’s how it can affect businesses. https://coberm.net/marcos-team-wants-to-eliminate-the-pogos-heres-how-it-can-affect-businesses/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 04:34:50 +0000 https://coberm.net/marcos-team-wants-to-eliminate-the-pogos-heres-how-it-can-affect-businesses/ MANILA, Philippines — The Marcos administration has been called the continuity government of former President Rodrigo Duterte. A departure from this narrative is the likely avoidance of online gambling – a controversial industry that flourished under Duterte – under President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. During the Development Budget Coordinating Committee budget briefing in the Senate on […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines — The Marcos administration has been called the continuity government of former President Rodrigo Duterte.

A departure from this narrative is the likely avoidance of online gambling – a controversial industry that flourished under Duterte – under President Ferdinand Marcos Jr.

During the Development Budget Coordinating Committee budget briefing in the Senate on Thursday, September 15, Finance Secretary Benjamin Diokno expressed the need to terminate the Philippine Offshore Gambling Operators (POGO) due to its “social cost”.

“In fact, China has abandoned POGO. Even Cambodia. It also carries reputational risk. People are going to ask, ‘Why are they going to the Philippines, it’s broken in China. Why are they going to the Philippines? Maybe because we’re cowards, we’re not strict on our rules,” said Diokno, who had served as Duterte’s budget chief and central bank governor.

If POGOs left the Philippines altogether under the Marcos administration, a web of business relationships could likely take a hit.

Economic gains

Since POGOs were allowed to expand in Manila in 2016, businesses such as properties, fintech, transportation, and restaurants have been given a massive dose of steroids with in-game money. Banks from which real estate companies borrowed funds also benefited from the rise of POGOs.

Industry estimates show that POGOs bring in 551 billion pesos in revenue to the economy annually. Businesses around POGO sites have also become somewhat dependent on them for their income.

However, POGOs were forced to close in March 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic, with their workers returning to China. (READ: Manila office vacancy to hit peak since global financial crisis)

During the pandemic, POGOs vacated a total of 454,000 square meters (m²) of office space, resulting in a sharp drop in rental rates.

Property experts had earlier expected POGOs to have a ‘revenge’ return as borders opened up, but data from Leechiu Property Consultants showed that the occupation of online gambling companies’ offices was almost zero from the first quarter of 2020 to the last quarter of 2021.

POGO office take-up only reached 21,000 m² in the second quarter of 2022. This pales in comparison to outsourcing companies, with 114,000 m² over the same period.

Latest figures from Leechiu Property Consultants showed that economic activity will return the office market to the pre-POGO and pre-pandemic state of 2016.

Companies like Eton Properties said they were “experiencing demand for their office developments for the second half of the year” as POGOs reappear to create new expansion offices in the Philippines.

Eton Properties, part of the Lucio Tan group of companies, has struck a deal with one of Southeast Asia’s “biggest” POGO companies, to lease more than 6,000 square meters of office space or two floors of its eWestPod building located inside the mixed-use Eton WestEnd Square development near Makati’s central business district.

“With the perceived stability and confidence of a new administration and the market beginning to normalise, Eton Properties has gradually felt an increase in demand for rental space during this second half. One of the main effects we see is the confidence of POGOs to return to the Philippines. These operators come not only from China, but also from our neighboring Southeast Asian countries,” said Kyle Tan, Executive Director of Eton Properties. (READ: What the POGO exodus means for the Philippine economy)

Worrying headaches

Diokno pointed out that POGO’s revenue fell to 3.9 billion pesos in 2021 from 7.2 billion pesos in 2020.

POGOs have to pay their host government much more.

Former Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III had repeatedly stated that POGOs and their employees evaded taxes. An interagency effort to padlock these POGOs was led by Dominguez himself.

Despite scathing remarks from former Cabinet members, Duterte continued to encourage the industry.

Social and political costs

Gambling is illegal in China and is strongly opposed by the communist government. Authorities stepped up the crackdown to serve as a stark warning.

To circumvent this hurdle, gambling companies are operating outside the continent to countries like the Philippines. (READ: The plight of a Chinese online gambling worker in Manila)

POGOs were also found to confiscate the passports of their employees, who had no idea they were working for gambling companies.

With their passports gone and unions and immigration officials associated with the project, Chinese nationals are forced to work in the Philippines and cannot visit the Chinese embassy for fear of persecution.

The sudden influx of Chinese workers into central business districts like Makati and Parañaque has led to friction between foreigners and locals. POGO workers were also raising rents in these areas, providing relief to residents.

To resolve the friction, the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation has offered to move Chinese workers to “stand-alone” centers. China opposed it.

The Philippine National Police has also uncovered kidnappings involving POGOs. Prostitution dens targeting POGO clients have also sprung up in Manila. (READ: Hontiveros sees link between influx of POGO workers and rise in sex trafficking in Manila)

Meanwhile, former defense chief Delfin Lorenzana said POGO workers could “easily switch” to espionage.

Due to these incidents, the Chinese Embassy urged Duterte to end POGOs, but the former president did not budge.

Simultaneous investigations by the House and Senate also reached conclusions about the social costs of POGO money. –Rappler.com

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Planning for the Best: Letting Go on a Whiteboard with Ed Henderson https://coberm.net/planning-for-the-best-letting-go-on-a-whiteboard-with-ed-henderson/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 08:27:10 +0000 https://coberm.net/planning-for-the-best-letting-go-on-a-whiteboard-with-ed-henderson/ With 15 years of experience in advertising agencies in London, Manchester and Belfast, Ed provides clear strategic direction for global brands. His client list includes; Diageo, eBay, Translink, Stena Line, Tourism Northern Ireland and Nissan. As Director of Planning at Ardmore, he works with clients to define business goals, metrics for success and deliver impactful […]]]>

With 15 years of experience in advertising agencies in London, Manchester and Belfast, Ed provides clear strategic direction for global brands. His client list includes; Diageo, eBay, Translink, Stena Line, Tourism Northern Ireland and Nissan.

As Director of Planning at Ardmore, he works with clients to define business goals, metrics for success and deliver impactful strategy, always based on insight.

LBB> According to you, what is the difference between a strategist and a planner? Is there a?

Ed> There’s a lot of hair-splitting and fine nuances in the industry about what a strategist and planner is. In my experience, titles are something that tends to muddy things up more than necessary. It is already a position which, unlike the creative director or the media manager, always calls for a necessarily vague definition at the start of any new client meeting.

But ultimately, however defined, both roles are consultants who work closely with brands to find the line best suited for success.

LBB> And according to you, which description corresponds best to your way of working?

Ed> Since I don’t really see a big clear distinction, how about this description for a suggested alternative?

It’s our job to simplify and translate a brand’s growth goals so that more creative minds than mine can find a solution.

It’s my repeated way of sidestepping the fuzzy definition of new client meetings. Let the customers know I’m the first to get involved before we can move on to more fun stuff!

LBB> We are used to hearing about the best creative advertising campaigns, but what is your favorite historical campaign from a strategic point of view? The one you think demonstrates a great strategy?

Ed> Probably the original work of Hovis “Boy on the bike” by Ridley Scott (1973) – Obviously the advertisement is a wonderful work that demands your attention. It’s a great reminder that we’re in the business of memorization. But beyond the creative, the category at the time was pushed to modernize and innovate. They could have easily followed the wave, but Hovis dug their heels and went the other way – exploring their brand’s history and heritage.

For me, this ad reflects the fact that ultimately strategy is a sacrifice – we are the ones who make the first and arguably most important decision in any campaign. Based on all the information, data, background music, category dynamics and everything else, that’s the direction we’re going to take. It takes confidence, clarity and, above all, the ability to present a simple and convincing argument for why this decision makes sense.

LBB> When turning a business brief into something that can inform an inspiring creative campaign, do you find the most useful resource to tap into?

Ed> I’m not even kidding when I say, a whiteboard – It’s a cliché, but I find the best way to structure my thinking is to let loose on a whiteboard. This is an opportunity for the planner to be sporadic and creative. This is also where you feel you can and should be wrong.

LBB> What part of your job/strategic process do you enjoy the most?

Ed> I like the start of a project when there’s hardly anything to do beyond a business goal. The evidence-building process that will ultimately inform the creative direction we’re going to take. It means digging deep into sources for answers. Research papers, first-party qualitative groups and quantitative surveys, social conversation are just some of the places where you need to invest time and energy to strike the gold.

The beginning always seems a bit daunting, but as time goes by and the whiteboard fills in, you start to see a clearer picture of where things need to go.

LBB> What strategic maxims, frameworks or principles do you find yourself returning to again and again? Why are they so useful?

Ed> There are a lot of complex modeling out there, so any framework that simplifies what we’re doing will always get my vote. I find myself almost daily returning to PR Smith’s SOSTAC model. Not necessarily from the start every time, but moving on at specific times to figure out what I need to focus on. It’s like a strategic compass – I’d be lost without it.

The value is in being able to really focus and nail each step before moving on to the next. Take the lens setting. Do I have a forensic understanding of the purposes of this mark? Not only what is driving growth for them, but also the supporting advertising objective and how will it contribute to that? This forces the right conversations with clients and the right responses so the agency gets the best job.

Works great for short-term campaign planning as well as long-term business and brand growth.

LBB> What kind of creatives do you like to work with? As a strategist, what do you want them to do with the information you give them?

Ed> In terms of ideal skills, I like working with creatives who can imagine without being influenced by advertising. Those who can forget that this idea will probably have to appear on TV, billboards and social media and just focus on the best way to solve the problem. It’s such a skill to master and something that keeps ideas raw, unformed and bright.

LBB> There is a negative stereotype that strategy is used to validate creative ideas, rather than as a resource to inform them and ensure they are effective. How do you make sure the agency is doing it the right way?

Ed> If you’ve ever worked with me, you’ll know that I love using analogies to ground things. I think of this challenge as a band in a recording studio. The creatives are in the booth with the instruments, making the album and the planners are on the other side, sitting behind the mixing desk. We can adjust faders and dials to sustain and guide but ultimately we have to trust the artists to write and play the songs.

I think mastering this dynamic comes down to the relationship between planning and creating. It’s so crucial to work on it because I think it leads to brilliant work. Too friendly and you run the risk of agreeing that a just OK idea is great. For tense, and you can’t agree on anything! There is a biting point of mutual respect where the shine occurs.

LBB> What have you found to be the most important consideration in recruiting and developing strategic talent?

Ed> Be influenced by what you love outside of work and apply it in your work. While there are always people in the industry talking about shiny new changes, there is ultimately a limit to the theory you can learn from advertising.

Beyond that, it’s about making a personal statement as a planner or creative. For that, you have to be influenced by your passions. Music, cinema, books, sport, fashion. Let them impress you and find a way to incorporate it into your profession.

It’s one of the great luxuries of working in a creative industry and something that I think needs to be instilled in any new talent that comes along.

LBB> In recent years, it seems that efficiency awards have gained more prestige and agencies are paying more attention to them. How do you think this has impacted the way strategists work and how they are perceived?

Ed> Naturally, as efficiency becomes more important in the industry, that means more and more agencies are taking ownership of the business impact of advertising. With this, planners take on the role of consultant and the positive behaviors and guidance that flow from it.

So you see more and more planners guiding brands towards a long-term vision. Less disposable creativity and more sustainable ideas. Fewer mobile first formats and more attention, wide-beam channels.

We are becoming more and more responsible for advertising because we know that it is the rules that lead to efficiency and rewards.

LBB> Do you have any frustrations with planning/strategy as a discipline?

Ed> Very few. Perhaps obvious, but considering what planning can bring as immaterial, it can therefore sometimes be underestimated. We don’t give you a media plan, but we help inform it. We do not reveal creation, but we help to guide it.

It’s certainly a selfish frustration, but I think we will forever be the unsung heroes of the advertising industry!

LBB> What advice would you give to anyone considering a career as a strategist/planner?

Ed> Start somewhere else first, then grow in that area but bring your previous skills with you. I am a strong proponent of bringing adjacent experience into the discipline. I did the obvious thing and went straight from account management to planning. I find that the best people always come first from a seemingly unrelated background.

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Wireless Sensor Market 2030 | Research emerging market trends and historical data to 2030, and identify growth drivers. https://coberm.net/wireless-sensor-market-2030-research-emerging-market-trends-and-historical-data-to-2030-and-identify-growth-drivers/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 15:10:50 +0000 https://coberm.net/wireless-sensor-market-2030-research-emerging-market-trends-and-historical-data-to-2030-and-identify-growth-drivers/ Torrance, California, USA -According to the latest study by MarkWide Research, wireless sensor market the CAGR is expected to be 22.85% between 2022 and 2030. Wireless sensors are a standard measurement tool fitted with wireless transmitters that can be adapted to convert modulated signals from process control instruments into a wireless signal that can be […]]]>

Torrance, California, USA -According to the latest study by MarkWide Research, wireless sensor market the CAGR is expected to be 22.85% between 2022 and 2030.

Wireless sensors are a standard measurement tool fitted with wireless transmitters that can be adapted to convert modulated signals from process control instruments into a wireless signal that can be transmitted via radio waves. This type of network was originally designed for military purposes, but today is used not only in military applications, but also in civilian, industrial and consumer markets. There are a number of different types of sensors available, which can be used to measure everything from building temperature to building resistance to water quality.

ADVANTAGES

  • A wireless sensor system offers several advantages over other types of sensors, such as accuracy and reliability, and it is possible to easily integrate electronic devices through the use of innovative technologies such as RFID and Bluetooth, which could facilitate the connection of electronic devices. To be integrated.
  • Hence, they have gained considerable traction over the past few years as a result of this. Sensors of this type are mainly used in factory settings to monitor production data flow to improve production efficiency.
  • Besides applications in automotive, defense, building automation and other industries, such as food and beverage, material handling and defense, these devices also have many applications in other areas.
  • With the growing desire for new energy sources, government regulations, development of renewable energy sources, and rapid advancements in technology, there is an increase in demand for wireless sensors.

Wireless sensor networks are expected to revolutionize the way communication takes place in the physical world over the next decade. It is imperative for organizations to achieve this new level of efficiency, accuracy and savings by having real-time visibility and intelligence for their organizational and operational data.

Download a sample PDF of our latest report: https://markwideresearch.com/download-sample/?productid=4910&submitTitle=Download+Sample

Market dynamics

A growing demand for remote monitoring is one of the drivers of this trend

  • The Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) has revolutionized industrial monitoring and diagnostics by providing monitoring points for sensor networks with low-power, low-cost wireless sensors that are interconnected via a wireless network.
  • Batteries are used in the construction of these wireless networks, in which battery-powered motes are used, which are capable of forming a wireless network that allows sensors to communicate with each other wirelessly.
  • Home automation, PC peripherals, remote controls, and other consumer applications can be realized with wireless sensor networks that can be used for consumer applications.

A number of restrictions apply, including privacy and security concerns

  • Data intrusions are also on the rise due to the growing development of connectivity technology. With the exponential growth of devices and connections, data would become more and more important over time.
  • It is a newly developed network platform that does not meet security compliance requirements as it is brand new. As enterprise data security is of utmost importance while developing analytics solutions for various vertically specific applications, it is a major impediment to the development of the wireless sensor network market.

SMBs have the opportunity to adopt WSN in a growing number of ways

  • Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMBs), as well as large players, both want to leverage the benefits of wireless sensor networks to increase the scalability and efficiency of their business processes.
  • WSN has a variety of benefits for SMBs, such as lower operating costs, greater agility and scalability, increased revenue, and improved performance, among others.
  • Adoption of the WSN by SMEs as a result will lead to a significant increase in their use of it.

A power source limitation is one of the challenges

  • There are no fixed infrastructures in wireless sensor networks, which means that network nodes must manage power from small batteries.
  • As frequent manual battery replacement of thousands of sensors, actuators and other connected devices within a wireless sensor network is not feasible, the main challenge is to manage the power consumption of the devices. who use wireless technologies such as WiFi, because it is an impossible task. task.

REPORT BENEFITS

  • With the help of this report, you can gain in-depth understanding of all the vital aspects related to the global Wireless Sensors Market.
  • The scope of this research ranges from macro market overview to micro details of industry performance, recent trends, key market drivers and challenges, and more.
  • Entrepreneurs, investors, researchers, consultants, business strategists, and anyone with interests or planning to venture into the wireless sensor industry in any way are recommended to read this report.

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Key Wireless Sensors Market Players Covered:

  • ABB Ltd,
  • STMicroelectronics,
  • Texas Instruments Incorporated,
  • Freescale Semiconductors Inc,
  • Rockwell Automation Inc.,
  • Emerson Electric Co,
  • Honeywell International Inc.,
  • Schneider Electric SA,
  • Endress+Hauser AG,
  • Yokogawa Electric Corporation,
  • Siemens AG and General Electric

Wireless Sensor Market Segmentation Analysis:

Breakdown by technology:

  • Bluetooth
  • Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi
  • ZigBee
  • WirelessHART
  • RFID
  • InOcean
  • Others

Breakdown by end use:

  • Industrial
  • Medical
  • Energy
  • Defense
  • Agriculture
  • Office and Residential
  • Others

Geographical segmentation of Wireless Sensor Market includes:

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia Pacific
  • South America
  • The Middle East and Africa

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About MarkWide Research:

MarkWide Search has established itself as an innovative and neoteric market research consultancy unrivaled in terms of adaptability and integrated strategies. We are committed to finding the most profitable market opportunities and providing effective data for your business to succeed in the market. MarkWide strives to provide tailored solutions to complex business problems and facilitates a simple decision-making process. MarkWide is a suite of pure wisdom and experience that was developed and established in 2016

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Dhruva College collaborates with VChic https://coberm.net/dhruva-college-collaborates-with-vchic/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 07:21:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/dhruva-college-collaborates-with-vchic/ Hyderabad: Dhruva College of Fashion Technology on Tuesday opened its Institute of Fashion Technology in Hitec City, Hyderabad, and reached an agreement with an international certification program in image management. The Fashion Technology Institute was opened by entrepreneur, curator and philanthropist Pinky Reddy. The event was also attended by Rajesh Chaturvedi, renowned image consultant and […]]]>

Hyderabad: Dhruva College of Fashion Technology on Tuesday opened its Institute of Fashion Technology in Hitec City, Hyderabad, and reached an agreement with an international certification program in image management.

The Fashion Technology Institute was opened by entrepreneur, curator and philanthropist Pinky Reddy. The event was also attended by Rajesh Chaturvedi, renowned image consultant and founder of VChic, an image consulting firm, Varsha Chaturvedi, co-founder of VChic.

The institute announced that it has entered into an agreement with Prowess Image by VChic for its international image management certification program. This is a one-of-a-kind collaboration in India, he said. VChic is a professional development academy in the field of image management, color psychology, personal branding, behavior, etiquettes and effective communication.

With this agreement, the institute can organize training for aspiring image consultants in Hyderabad. The college will teach students how to creatively implement seasonal looks in terms of fashion, style, image, color analysis, makeup and etiquette, and also how to become an expert in the industry of the picture, he said.

Speaking on the occasion, Jakkidi Venkat Reddy, Chairman of Dhruva Group of Colleges said, “Our goal is to have at least one internationally certified image consultant in every household in the city of Hyderabad. two three-year courses: a Bachelor of Fashion Technology (BFT) and Bachelors in Apparel Fashion Technology (BAFT).

Pinky Reddy said image management is very important to everyone. “We may be well-educated, talented and smart, but if we lack self-confidence, we cannot succeed in life. Image management plays a key role in building self-confidence. self,” she said.

Mounika Reddy, vice president of the Dhruva Group of Colleges, said there were 50 places in each course and 10+2 students were eligible on the basis of merit.

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Hands-on practice builds skills and confidence https://coberm.net/hands-on-practice-builds-skills-and-confidence/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 20:03:49 +0000 https://coberm.net/hands-on-practice-builds-skills-and-confidence/ Simulation consultants Nicholle Oomen, left, Megan Rolleman and Cydnee Bryksa work at the Stollery Critical Care Simulation Lab, which opened in May 2021. Photo by Evan Isbister. Stollery’s Critical Care Simulation Lab Boosts Care Through Education Kathleen Deman’s Story | Photo by Evan Isbister EDMONTON — It’s been a busy and rewarding year of skills […]]]>

Simulation consultants Nicholle Oomen, left, Megan Rolleman and Cydnee Bryksa work at the Stollery Critical Care Simulation Lab, which opened in May 2021. Photo by Evan Isbister.

Stollery’s Critical Care Simulation Lab Boosts Care Through Education

Kathleen Deman’s Story | Photo by Evan Isbister

EDMONTON — It’s been a busy and rewarding year of skills development at Stollery Children’s Hospital Critical Care Simulation Lab, where simulation has been a cornerstone of the hospital’s teaching strategy since 2006.

In fact, since its launch in May 2021, the lab has attracted 965 participants in 203 simulation sessions, making it the most active simulation program in the Edmonton area.

The primary goal of the program is to provide what-if scenarios where staff can hone their skills in providing care to patients throughout their hospital journey. The lab team supports staff by reminding them that it’s okay to feel out of your comfort zone at times and creates opportunities to practice and refresh skills and build confidence in their abilities.

The launch of the Stollery Critical Care Simulation Lab program coincided with the opening of the new pediatric critical care redevelopment at the Stollery, a state-of-the-art space funded by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation. A strong supporter of simulation for years, the foundation provided the latest equipment and human resources needed to integrate simulation throughout the hospital.

“Thanks to funding from the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation, we have now been able to hire two dedicated simulation consultants and a director for the hospital, and the program has grown exponentially,” says Dr. Jonathan Duff, medical director of the simulation laboratory. program and associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics.

“Securing resources for a more formal program was a challenge and as a result, the use of simulation was restricted to certain areas of the hospital where simulation champions were able to integrate it into the program with their learners. These new simulation consultants work with both Stollery Hospital and the provincial eSim team.

Some of the most impactful initiatives supported by the program include the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) Complex Patient Program, CPR activation and Connect Care training.

In one scenario, for example, teams from Stollery’s Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Life Support, Operating Room (OR), and Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU) come together to practice an emergency process. The “patient” in this simulation (a high-tech baby dummy) starts out in CICU and then deteriorates to cardiac arrest. The PCICU team manages the arrest for five minutes before initiating the protocol to activate the ECMO Life Support and OR teams. These teams then arrive on the unit and surgically place the dummy patient on the highest level of life support.

“The opportunity for these teams to come together and assess processes that span multiple departments in a controlled environment has been invaluable,” says Nicholle Oomen, simulation consultant, eSIM at Stollery Children’s Hospital.

“In our first session alone, a latent threat to patient safety was discovered – and processes were changed in response to this discovery. This type of simulation highlights how the simulation program appreciates the complexities of patient care in several areas of the Stollery. This shows how we can facilitate cross-departmental simulation to drive process improvement.

Not only is simulation useful for practicing critical skills, such as during cardiac arrests, but it also has the potential to provide a safe environment for staff to consider the added complexity of having family members present during such emergency events.

“The Stollery Patient and Family Centered Care team is excited to partner with the simulation program to develop scenarios for teams to practice the skills needed to deliver bad news and help families understand what just happened to them. their child through these difficult events in a psychologically safe place,” says Joelle Fawcett-Arsenault, Patient and Family Centered Care Coordinator at Stollery Children’s Hospital.

“Staff are expected to be able to have these difficult conversations with families. But more often than not, they’ve never had the opportunity to practice, to get feedback, to trust that they’re going to be the character in this family’s hospital experience that they want to be.

As the Stollery Simulation Program develops, one of its goals is to provide each staff member with an opportunity to practice basic patient and family-centered communication and to receive feedback from patients and family volunteers.

Additionally, the program is set to expand to provide simulation for families and caregivers of medically complex children to practically prepare for their transition from hospital to community.

In its first year, Stollery’s simulation lab program grew exponentially. The coming year will focus on its expansion into areas outside the ICU to ensure physicians, staff, students and families can reap the benefits of simulation-based education.

The Stollery Simulation Program falls under the Provincial Simulation Program eSIM (Educate, Simulate, Innovate and Motivate) — the single body that provides governance and sets standards for simulation-based education and activities across Alberta.

“We believe this program will help shape the future of health education,” adds Dr. Duff. “High quality education leads to high quality care.”


this year’s international Medical Simulation Week from September 12 to 16 on the theme “Excellence in a new era”.

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7 People on the Move: Risk & Insurance https://coberm.net/7-people-on-the-move-risk-insurance/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 00:31:14 +0000 https://coberm.net/7-people-on-the-move-risk-insurance/ Verisk Names Independent Director to Board, United Educator President and CEO Announces Retirement and More in This Edition of People on the Move. Verisk welcomes a new member to its board of directors Olumide Soroye, Board of Directors, Verisk Verisk has appointed Olumide Soroye as an independent director on the company’s board. For three decades, […]]]>

Verisk Names Independent Director to Board, United Educator President and CEO Announces Retirement and More in This Edition of People on the Move.

Verisk welcomes a new member to its board of directors

Olumide Soroye, Board of Directors, Verisk

Verisk has appointed Olumide Soroye as an independent director on the company’s board. For three decades, Soroye held leadership positions in multiple industries.

“Olumide’s background in software, data analytics, AI and growth-focused leadership make him an outstanding addition to Verisk’s Board of Directors,” said Lee Shavel, CEO of Verisk. . “We look forward to working closely with Olumide to ensure that we continue to drive value and positive impact for all of Verisk’s stakeholders, including shareholders, customers, employees and partners.”

Soroye is President and CEO of Fortive Corporation’s Intelligent Operations Solutions segment.

Prior to Fortive, he held leadership roles at CoreLogic, where he handled real estate intelligence and risk management, and at QuinStreet, where he led the company’s technology and home services businesses. .

Prior to QuinStreet, he was a partner at McKinsey & Company, where he was recognized for his growth and innovation strategies for several world-class technology companies, according to a press release.

President and CEO of United Educators to retire in 2023

Risk retention group United Educators Insurance (UE) recently announced the upcoming retirement of its Chief Executive Officer Janice Abraham in the summer of 2023.

Janice Abraham, President and CEO, United Educators Insurance

“On behalf of the Board of Directors, I would like to express our gratitude to Janice for the wonderful job she has done in leading UE over the past quarter century to its current position as the world’s leading risk management and transfer company. U.S. Education Service,” Morgan said. R. Olsen, Chairman of EU Subscribers Council.

“Janice has demonstrated superb leadership skills in providing a rock-solid foundation for the future of our member-owned captive. His work has enabled the EU to be in the strongest possible position today, developing a cohesive, creative and skilled management team and keeping a laser focus on our service to education.” he added.

Abraham has served as President and CEO of UE for the past 25 years. Prior to that, she worked as an EU administrator at Cornell University and Whitman College.

She was recognized for spearheading several notable achievements for the organization during her tenure, including “award-winning risk management programs and services driving the adoption of enterprise risk management in educational institutions. public and private,” according to a press release.

The search for UE’s next President and CEO will soon begin.

Swiss Re Corporate Solutions Canada Appoints New Leadership to Client Management Team

Andrea Douglass, Senior Vice President, Client Management Canada, Swiss Re

Swiss Re Corporate Solutions has appointed Andrea Douglass as Senior Vice President, Customer Management Canada. Douglass will be responsible for strategic relationships with large corporate clients across Canada, according to a press release.

Based in Toronto, Douglass succeeds Sarah Kestle who will soon be retiring.

“I’m thrilled to have someone with Andrea’s experience and caliber on our team,” said Adrian Hall, CEO Canada, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions. “His strong track record of customer focus, creativity and strategic leadership will drive our drive to deliver customer-centric solutions and deliver an exceptional customer experience to advance business insurance together.”

Douglass held various leadership positions of increasing responsibility within the customer and distribution space at Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty and RSA Insurance.

EPIC expands talent across Private Client, National Voluntary Benefits and Greyling

EPIC Insurance Brokers and Consultants has hired Chris Novotney as Vice President, Private Client Advisor.

Novotney brings to his new role more than 15 years of experience working with wealth management advisors, family office heads, CPAs and estate planning lawyers. He will be responsible for developing relationships and utilizing EPIC’s private client solutions platform to secure custom homes, high value collector automobiles, fine art collections, mega- yachts, aviation, personal protection and cyber solutions, according to a press release.

“We are delighted to welcome Chris to our team. His proven expertise and track record of success in advising thriving individuals and families is underpinned by his dedication to advocating on behalf of clients,” said Steve Nelson, Chief Growth Officer of EPIC, to whom Novotney will report.

EPIC also welcomed Kerry Connor as the new head of its national voluntary benefits practice. Based in the Philadelphia area, Connor will support EPIC account teams and customers in designing, funding and delivering the full suite of voluntary benefit offerings, according to a press release.

Connor has worked in the field of voluntary benefits for over 20 years. Early in her career, she ran a listing company that served the brokerage community and businesses directly in the medium and large markets. She was also one of the top national sales directors for cybersecurity companies.

“Kerry brings a great balance of direct selling experience and working collaboratively with the brokerage community,” said Craig Hasday, president, national benefits practice, EPIC. “I have no doubt that his leadership will bring incredible value to our clients, either directly or through their current EPIC advisors. The evolution of the workforce has made the personalization of family benefits on an individual basis an essential service.

Roger Guilian, Senior Vice President, Risk Management, Greyling Division, EPIC

Roger Guilian, JD, has joined EPIC’s Greyling Division as Senior Vice President, Risk Management. He will be in charge of “risk prevention and management advice; develop key legal and legislative initiatives for major design companies; as well as customer service,” according to a press release.

He will be based in the Fairhope, Alabama area and will report to Gregg Bundschuh, general manager of Greyling, a division of EPIC.

Guilian joins Greyling from an ENR Top 100 civil engineering company where he served as General Counsel.

During nearly two decades as in-house legal counsel, he “has acquired extensive experience and knowledge in matters affecting the risks and legal exposure of engineers, their companies and other design professionals, including contract risk management, professional liability insurance and defense of errors and omissions claims,” the statement said.

“We are delighted to have Roger join Greyling. His experience as a trusted advisor to a large, sophisticated design firm and engineering professionals will bring immediate and direct value to our customers,” said Bundschuh. commitment to customer service and professional advice aligns perfectly with our historical practices.”

Synergy Comp Appoints New President

After more than three decades of service, CEO and founder of Synergy Comp Insurance Company, Lew Kachulis, has stepped down as president. Chris Blough will succeed him as president.

Brough has over 20 years of executive leadership experience. He began his career in financial services and has served as president of a commercial finance company, CEO of a credit union and, most recently, CEO of Mennonite Mutual Insurance Company, according to a press release.

Although Kachulis has stepped down as president, he will continue to support the organization as CEO. Synergy Comp’s Board of Directors and senior management have expressed their support for the change and are confident that Blough is the right person to continue building momentum.

“We look forward to Chris joining the team and are excited about Synergy Comp’s long-term future,” said Kachulis.

“Synergy has carved out a unique and valuable space for itself in the working model industry, and I’m excited to work with Lew and the team to expand that value and build on a strong foundation,” Blough said. &

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Mentoring: beacons for future engineers https://coberm.net/mentoring-beacons-for-future-engineers/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 10:39:19 +0000 https://coberm.net/mentoring-beacons-for-future-engineers/ A mentorship program to encourage undergraduate students to consider a career in ground engineering is now two years old. Helen Russell talks to mentors and mentees about the difference it has made for them. The moment of Ebenezer Adenmosun’s light bulb came during a technical committee meeting of the Federation of Pile Specialists (FPS) about […]]]>

A mentorship program to encourage undergraduate students to consider a career in ground engineering is now two years old. Helen Russell talks to mentors and mentees about the difference it has made for them.

The moment of Ebenezer Adenmosun’s light bulb came during a technical committee meeting of the Federation of Pile Specialists (FPS) about three years ago.

“I looked around the room and realized that the only woman there was the one taking the minutes, and the only non-white person was myself. It seemed very strange, especially since we were in the middle of London, one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world,” he recalls.

Ebenezer Adenmosun

Although the experience was nothing out of the ordinary in his professional life, this time around, for some reason, it really hit home, prompting him to think about what he could do to remedy his this imbalance.

His desire to make a difference led to the creation of the Ground Forum Undergraduate Mentorship Programwhich is now coming to the end of its second year.

After his revelation, Adenmosun – who is a director of Geofirma Consultants – decided to raise the subject with Steve Hadley, then president of the FPS. Although they didn’t know each other at the time, Adenmosun says Hadley’s public profile suggested he would be receptive to the need to improve diversity and inclusion in their industry.

The two agreed that if they wanted to make a difference in the industry, one of the best ways was to start with the primary entry point and try to encourage more students from diverse backgrounds to consider a career as a ground engineer in construction. Civil engineering students are not always aware of the opportunities in construction, while those studying geology are more likely to go into the oil and gas sector where there is an obvious career path and high financial rewards.

The main goal of the program, which launched in the fall of 2020, is to put undergraduate students who want to learn more about industry opportunities with those who have been in it for some time. There are workshops to help students develop presentation and interview skills and help them create effective CVs, but the main benefit identified by mentees was access to a professional network.

In many cases, they found internships through mentors or their contacts. Also, the opportunity to talk to people in the industry and the work they do was invaluable.

It certainly fits some mentors, especially those who come from underrepresented groups that Adenmosun is keen to attract.

Bhagi Hegde

Bhagi Hegde

Bhagi Hegde is the Principal Geotechnical Engineer for Infrastructure at Atkins, where she has worked for 14 years.

Less than a year after moving to the UK in 2005, she met Adenmosun while on secondment: “We’ve stayed in touch ever since, and whenever I see any FPS or Ground Forum initiatives , I see names that are familiar to me; us such a strong network and it has been incredibly helpful to me. I feel connected and involved; It gives me confidence to know that I am not alone in the industry, that I have people that I can relate to, who will understand my situation and the difficulties that I have had in my career.

In the first year of the program, Adenmosun explains, they had about 20 mentors and 40 mentees.

“We could have had more mentors because we had to turn down some applicants,” he recalls. “We didn’t want to overload the mentors and we had to make sure that the students benefited enough.

“Ideally, I would like it to be an individual process,” he adds. “It’s also about developing them personally, acting as a sounding board for them, building their confidence and making them more complete students. That’s what I appreciate the most. »

Matthew Smith

Matthew Smith

Mentor Matt Smith, who is the COO for Expanded, remembers getting one of his mentees to visit a large construction site for the first time.

“I realized after about 30 seconds that he wasn’t listening to me – he was just looking around and recording everything, and he was hooked on the spot. It makes me really happy to be able to offer someone one that kind of experience.

Hegde adds, “The mentors tend to be busy because they are very active in their own work, which is actually the best thing about this program. They are professionals with links and contacts in the sector. It’s not a tutorial. We don’t give students lessons and manuals to read; it’s about helping them transition into the industry.

The free program is open to all undergraduates taking relevant courses, although the first class focused heavily on civil engineering, Adenmosun says, mainly because that’s where he and his FPS colleagues had contacts.

But as Smith explains, this limited options for mentees, hence the need to link up with the Ground Forum.

“Most of the members of the FPS are involved in structures – be it buildings, dams or bridges,” he says. “The involvement of other members of the Ground Forum has opened it up to well drilling, offshore, mining and the energy sector, which has provided more opportunities for those involved in the project – and even allowed me to better understand what is going on.”

In year two, there was a push not only to increase the number of mentors, but to broaden the reach; a movement that the organizers want to continue.

“It’s not just old people like me that we need,” smiles Smith, “it’s also good to get the fresh perspective of the younger ones. Even if they don’t want to be mentors, it’s good to get them talking with the students.

“The nature of contract work is that it can be very transient, so a big part of adjusting for new staff is learning life skills and getting used to living away from home and managing their own business, while trying to understand where they fit into a business or project.

Mentees

Muchai Mbugua

Muchai Mbugua

Muchai Mbugua has just completed the second year of a four-year integrated master’s degree in civil engineering at the University of Sheffield. He laughs, recalling his former ignorance of the soil engineering industry: “At the time, I didn’t even know that soil engineering was a ‘thing’,” he says. “I thought foundations were just designed the same as a beam or a column.”

He heard about the mentorship program when it launched in October 2020 through the university’s civil engineering department email newsletter. After doing some research, he decided to apply.

Mbugua was paired with Ebenezer Adenmosun as a mentor, and the two met online once every two months.

“In the beginning, besides giving me a much better understanding of ground engineering and what he does in his job, he helped me a lot with my resume.”

Mbugua wanted to improve his presentation skills, so Adenmosun set topics for him to research and present at later meetings.

“Because I was interviewing for internships, Ebenezer also asked me to share my experience with other mentees through an interview workshop,” he recalls.

“It was intimidating at first, but it was really good for me and helped me get the confidence I wanted for the presentation.” Adenmosun offered him an internship at Geofirma in the summer of 2021. Although he enjoyed the work and considers geotechnics his first career choice, he is keen to explore all options.

Jaya Basra

Jaya BasraJaya Basra has just completed a year-long industrial placement at Arup and will be returning to Loughborough University in the autumn to pursue the third year of her civil engineering degree. She joined the program in 2020 after receiving an email from the university urging students – especially women and those of black, Asian and minority backgrounds – to get involved.

She remembers the first meeting of the program participants. Due to Covid restrictions, it had to unfold as a huge Zoom call with breakout rooms where mentors and their assigned mentees could familiarize themselves, with organizers Adenmosun and Hadley showing up to introduce themselves.

Basra recalls that the opportunities offered by the program were largely student-driven, especially since the mentors are busy professionals.

“You can do as much or as little as you want. There are no rules or schedules for how often you meet or what you do.

“My mentor was very busy and unavailable initially, but I stayed in touch with her and she helped me with a mock interview. I also ended up getting a one-week placement at Central Piling because I asked if there were any available.

Basra chose to study civil engineering because she wanted to have the greatest impact on sustainability.

“But in my second year, I started to worry that I had chosen an industry that was one of the biggest contributors to carbon emissions, and there was nothing I could do about it.”

His mentors and industry experience have given him insight into the contribution engineers can make to sustainability through effective design.

Ellie Scott

Ellie ScottIt was the draw that led Ellie Scott to study Engineering Geology and the Geotechnical degree at the University of Portsmouth. “My university lecturer suggested the course to me because I had done very well in geology – I was actually planning on going to the army,” she explains. “She made me flip a coin and that’s how I ended up in college.”

Scott admits that although she wasn’t initially keen on geology, when she started studying she found she really enjoyed it. But his knowledge of opportunities in the sector was limited: “Even in my first year, I didn’t know what career paths were open to me. So it was really good when I joined the Ground Forum program in my second year, because I met a lot of people from different backgrounds, and it opened my eyes to what was available .

Paired with mentor Matt Smith, she recalls a series of Zoom meetings, workshops that helped her develop her interview and resume writing skills. “We were split into small groups which made it easy to chat and network with people.”

Her current placement in the industry, which she is nearing the end of, has also been aided by contacts through the mentorship program – and when she had to be formally interviewed, all that practice has served her well.

“I have worked as a site engineer for WJ Groundwater at many High Speed ​​2 sites around Birmingham. The company specializes in water management, so we only work on sites that require dewatering,” she explains. “We have performed a number of pump tests and are providing data that engineers will use in design work.”

She now knows she wants to get into hydrogeology, having discovered its connection to the building process. She hopes to be able to continue this kind of work after she graduates. “I really enjoyed the experience of being there,” says Scott.

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