Early response http://coberm.net/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 17:48:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://coberm.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13-120x120.png Early response http://coberm.net/ 32 32 Demand for system change also calls for snap elections – The Island https://coberm.net/demand-for-system-change-also-calls-for-snap-elections-the-island/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 00:20:22 +0000 https://coberm.net/demand-for-system-change-also-calls-for-snap-elections-the-island/ Amazing Thailand has been ranked the fourth most attractive travel destination in the world, post-pandemic, with Bangkok, Phuket, Chiang Mai and Hua Hin being the top Thai cities that global travelers search for online. And I have visited all these exciting destinations, courtesy of the Tourism Authority of Thailand and the Royal Thai Embassy in […]]]>

Amazing Thailand has been ranked the fourth most attractive travel destination in the world, post-pandemic, with Bangkok, Phuket, Chiang Mai and Hua Hin being the top Thai cities that global travelers search for online. And I have visited all these exciting destinations, courtesy of the Tourism Authority of Thailand and the Royal Thai Embassy in Sri Lanka.

The study, according to Visa Global Travel Intentions Study 2021, was conducted from January to October 2021, with data analyzed from more than 7,000 keywords searched by travelers from 62 countries, as well as travel information in Thailand, in five Thai tourist cities and travelers. feelings about the impact of the pandemic on the travel situation.

The study indicated that the top three motivations for international travelers intending to visit Thailand are recreation (30%), the opportunity to get away from it all and relax (25%) and outdoor adventure. (18%). This demonstrates that visitors are looking for a stress-free vacation that offers optimal opportunities to relax, get out and leave the worries of the pandemic behind.

The study also found that when in Thailand, tourists are more likely to head to activities and attractions that Thailand is famous for. The main activity preferences are towards a famous Thai massage, eating Thai food at cafes and restaurants, spending time at their resort and embracing Thai culture; like visiting a Buddhist temple.

Of course, for Sri Lankans, I would also add shopping!

According to the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA), Thailand’s tourism industry is showing signs of recovery, with an increase in visitor numbers over the next three years, which is expected to reach around 46.96 million… by the end of 2024. The continued easing of tourist entry requirements throughout the year should make it easier for tourists to return to Thailand.

Meanwhile, Thailand’s Center for COVID-19 Situation Administration (CCSA) has approved the simplified Thailand Pass check-in and entry rules for international arrivals, which came into effect on June 1, 2022.

Foreign nationals are still required to apply for a Thailand Pass (via https://tp.consular.go.th/), but will only need to provide passport details, vaccinations and a police visa. health insurance of 10,000 USD.

The system will then automatically issue a Thailand Pass QR code for applicants. Thais, however, will no longer be required to apply for a Thailand Pass.

Upon arrival in Thailand, vaccinated travelers must undergo entry screening and then will be permitted entry and are free to travel anywhere in the kingdom.

Unvaccinated/not fully vaccinated travellers, who are able to upload proof of a negative RT-PCR or professional ATK test, within 72 hours of travel, through the Thailand Pass system, will also be permitted to enter and are free to go anywhere in the Kingdom.

The CCSA also approved a further easing of COVID-19 controls nationwide with three color-coded zones: Pilot Tourism Zones or Blue Zones, Surveillance or Green Zone, and Strictly Supervised Zones or Yellow Zone.

night entertainment venues; such as pubs, bars and karaoke lounges, in the green and blue zones, will be allowed to resume operations, including the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages, on site, until midnight. However, all sites have been asked to strictly comply with the prevention instructions.

The CCSA also lifted the quarantine requirement for the high-risk contact.

Alright, if you’re thinking about a well-deserved vacation, make sure it’s ‘Thailand here I am.’

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Surry Early College secondary school start https://coberm.net/surry-early-college-secondary-school-start/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/surry-early-college-secondary-school-start/ June 01, 2022 Although Livia Livengood is a career educator who can speak four languages, her multi-talented background established over the years did not include being an expert baker. However, that has changed in recent months with the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which has been accompanied by the local resident spending a lot of time […]]]>

Although Livia Livengood is a career educator who can speak four languages, her multi-talented background established over the years did not include being an expert baker.

However, that has changed in recent months with the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which has been accompanied by the local resident spending a lot of time around the oven in addition to her teaching job at Mount Airy Secondary School.

Livenwood, originally from Romania, was so touched by the plight of Ukrainian refugees that she started baking and selling bread from her home’s kitchen to help them financially. And at last report, that effort had generated more than $12,000 — including 142 loaves as of Monday afternoon.

“I just wanted to do something to help out,” said Livengood, who worked in high school for 16 years, currently teaching Spanish.

Although her bread-making charity project coincided with the Russian attack on Ukraine, she wasn’t exactly a newbie in the baking department, though it was a relatively recently acquired skill.

“I’m not (a baker by tradition),” Livengood said without hesitation, explaining that adopting the role stemmed from her own family’s needs in the wake of the pandemic.

“You didn’t know if you were going to find bread in the store,” she explained.

So after the Ukrainian invasion, Livengood naturally turned to her new cooking abilities to help refugees, initially generating a net sum in a week via this method for a UNICEF program. “I was surprised to raise $400.”

Previously, she and her 16-year-old daughter Laura baked bread together to provide agility items to a local dog park run by Rotary Club members.

Livengood’s Ukrainian attendance grew a bit after seeing refugees up close and personal rather than such random individuals on TV.

This happened because some took refuge in her native country, Romania, located in the same part of the world as Ukraine, who struck a chord with the local woman upon seeing them.

A German pastor from a church in Romania who initially cared for 17 refugees, including a number of children, posted a photo of the group. “He puts them in the German parish church,” Livengood said.

“I saw the children and I thought, ‘I have to do more for the children,'” she added of expanding her Ukrainian aid efforts, noting that many worthy organizations provide assistance.

“This pastor is the brother of one of my best friends from high school,” Livengood explained. “He didn’t even ask for help, he just posted the photo, and I was saddened by it – I just wanted to do something to help.”

Consumer prices are much higher in Romania than here, according to the Mount Airy High teacher.

“Everything is double there,” Livengood said, including a $2,000-a-month electricity bill where the refugees were housed. “I don’t know how people survive and get by, it’s so expensive to live.”

Thousands of dollars have been spent just to bring in refugees from Ukraine.

Four loaves a day

Livia Livengood suddenly found herself juggling the job of teaching at Mount Airy High School with a growing side business of baking bread, which certainly implied a marketable product, given her previous success in baking. fundraiser for UNICEF and the dog park. “Everybody loves bread.”

This would eventually include baking four to six loaves a day in her kitchen at home. “It’s yeast bread,” she said of the product at issue. “It looks and tastes like sourdough.”

The process isn’t as easy as it sounds, with the bread dough having to be put together at the end of each day, Livengood advised. “And he gets up during the night.” The dough should also be kneaded, baking being done in the morning before the teacher comes to school.

There was one occasion when Livengood overloaded his oven and nearly set the house on fire. “It was a bad idea,” she admits, which also involved burning the four loaves that were baking at the time.

Her family have been very understanding about the business, she said, which in addition to her daughter includes husband Rob and son Luca, 14.

Livia and Rob met in 2001 while serving overseas with the Peace Corps. She came to Mount Airy in 2004.

“I’ve been teaching high school for 16 years,” said Livengood, who in addition to teaching Spanish now, also taught German for a few years. On the whole, she speaks these two languages, plus English and Romanian.

After operating at peak production, the baking operation has gradually scaled down from four to two loaves a day and now around two every other day.

“Right now it’s very manageable,” Livengood said.

Audience willing to help

“The response has been very overwhelming — in a very positive way,” Livengood said of the bread-making campaign. The process of ordering/selling breads was done through a Facebook page she maintains to help Ukrainians.

This has been bolstered by the many followers she has accumulated over the years, including former students and others. “I have quite a few followers, which helps.”

A suggested charge, or donation, for each loaf is $20, with the option to pay more – due to the added motivation of helping oppressed people rather than just getting your money’s worth.

“Some give $20 and some give $100 – it’s up to people what they want to give,” Livengood said. “A lot of people just wanted the bread.”

Besides its sales, contributions to help Ukrainians have taken other forms.

Livengood mentioned attending a charity event to promote her cause earlier this year at Miss Angel’s Farm. “A complete stranger gave me $500.”

The Central Methodist Church also donated $1,000.

Meanwhile, Donna Bailey baked cinnamon rolls to support the fundraiser, and Harlan Stone baked a few loaves of bread for the effort.

Some people donated flour, including Chris Wishart, the chef of Old North State Winery, who donated a 60-pound bag. Mount Airy Beta Sigma Phi Xi Alpha Pi Chapter donated $500, with group members donating more individually.

Among other helpers, Pamela Hicks raised $1,000 by donating two of her paintings to Ukrainian fundraising, including hosting an online silent auction that saved Livengood time. She also thanked Mark Walker and Stanton Denman for obtaining the paintings, as well as an anonymous donor who contributed $400.

“People have given so much,” observed the teacher/baker. “The generosity of people has been incredible.”

All the money goes to the church in Romania.

Livengood stressed that refugees will continue to need rent and other support as they settle into new homes and she plans to maintain her bread-making business indefinitely.

“As long as it helps. »

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AFRYDEV empowers 12 Yobe communities on violent extremism early warning https://coberm.net/afrydev-empowers-12-yobe-communities-on-violent-extremism-early-warning/ Sat, 21 May 2022 21:17:11 +0000 https://coberm.net/afrydev-empowers-12-yobe-communities-on-violent-extremism-early-warning/ Participants in Violent Extremism Training organized by AFRYDEV in Potiskum, Yobe State As violent extremism continues to escalate in the North East sub-region of Nigeria, the need to engage and sensitize communities on its early warning has become paramount. This situation informed the decision of the African Foundation for Peace Development and Empowerment (AFRYDEV) with […]]]>
Participants in Violent Extremism Training organized by AFRYDEV in Potiskum, Yobe State

As violent extremism continues to escalate in the North East sub-region of Nigeria, the need to engage and sensitize communities on its early warning has become paramount.

This situation informed the decision of the African Foundation for Peace Development and Empowerment (AFRYDEV) with financial support from USAID through Northeastern Connection on a project titled “Supporting community platforms in Damaturu and Potiskum to detect and report early warning threats”. Declaring the validation meeting open in Potiskum, the chairman of the local government represented by his vice chairman, Ado Hamza Ngojin, revealed that if violent extremism was mitigated in its early stages, most of the problems would not have occurred. He thanked AFRYDEV for coming up with such initiatives and called for the engagement of more communities.

The program was aimed at fostering unity with the specific objective of building a comprehensive and self-sustaining mechanism to report and respond to violent extremism/conflict triggers in the LGA communities of Damaturu and Potiskum, as well as identify issues that trigger and reduce threats of ISWAP infiltration into vulnerable communities in Damaturu and Potiskum.

Blueprint put together, the project would work with relevant stakeholders to identify and strengthen the first existing structures and support the establishment of new mechanisms where none exist, as violent extremism is believed to start from the communities and if the response is early enough, it will mitigate its escalation.

In his opening address, the State Police Public Relations Officer, ASP Dungus Abdulkarim, instructs communities to engage their neighborhoods in peacebuilding. “I want to thank the team for this wonderful project, indeed if this gets full attention and community members comply with it by reporting early warnings, then our community will be free from violent extremism.

For his part, the Emir of Fika, president of the councils of chiefs, HRH Dr. Muhammad Abali Muhammad Idris pledges his support. “Based on the purpose and objectives of the project, I believe that this will go a long way in bringing peace to our communities, we will give you all the maximum support necessary during the implementation of the project and ensure compliance from community members from all angles.

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Identification of infectious agents in early chinook and marine coho salmon associated with cohort survival https://coberm.net/identification-of-infectious-agents-in-early-chinook-and-marine-coho-salmon-associated-with-cohort-survival/ Thu, 19 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/identification-of-infectious-agents-in-early-chinook-and-marine-coho-salmon-associated-with-cohort-survival/ Cohort survival was estimated using UC-matched CWT data (as determined by GSI; Fig. 2; Supplementary Material 1, Table S2). CWTs are small, serially etched bands of metal that are implanted in the snout of juvenile salmon (Johnson, 1990). Many studies of marine survival of Pacific salmon populations, particularly those in the Columbia River in northern […]]]>
Cohort survival was estimated using UC-matched CWT data (as determined by GSI; Fig. 2; Supplementary Material 1, Table S2). CWTs are small, serially etched bands of metal that are implanted in the snout of juvenile salmon (Johnson, 1990). Many studies of marine survival of Pacific salmon populations, particularly those in the Columbia River in northern British Columbia, rely on survival estimates determined by CWT recoveries from hatchery fish. Some of these studies have found considerable heterogeneity in survival estimates over large spatial scales, with nearby populations showing more similar survival patterns (Zimmerman et al. 2015; Ruff et al. 2017). For Chinook Salmon, we matched CUs (sometimes multiple) to CWT survival data based on previously used assignments (Supplementary Material 1, Table S2; DFO 2018; Brown et al. 2020). Since CWTs are used as indicator stocks for management units (as opposed to CUs) for coho salmon, we determined these matches for this species based on the proximity between the locations of origin of the CWTs (usually hatcheries) and CUs (Supplementary Document 1, Table S2).
For chinook and coho salmon, we used previously calculated estimates of smolt-to-adult returns (SAR; Fig. 2) based on CWT data. Since hatchery fish are released into freshwater prior to seaward migration, SAR estimates include survival during freshwater migration, in addition to seaward residence and return spawning migration. However, survival cannot be broken down between these periods. For coho salmon, an updated version of the dataset used by Zimmerman et al. (2015) was acquired as part of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project (marinesurvivalproject.com/). We acquired SAR estimates for Interior Fraser Coho (IFR, Supplementary Material 1, Table S2) from Arbeider et al. (2020). Estimates for these datasets were based on CWTs recovered from age 3 coho salmon caught in fisheries and returned to hatcheries and spawning grounds. To generate a SAR estimate, CWT recoveries from fisheries and escapements were expanded by the fraction of total catch and escapement sampled, summed and divided by the number of CWT smolts released in the corresponding brood year. . The SAR estimation approaches for both species of salmon assume perfect detection of CWTs in sampled fish and no loss of CWT in surviving fish. For chinook salmon, we used SAR estimates generated by the Pacific Salmon Commission (TSC) Chinook Technical Committee (SAR) Exploitation Rate Analysis (ERA); Chinook Technical Committee 2019, pers. comm. Gayle Brown, CTC), as described in Welch et al. (2021). The SAR estimates for chinook we used were calculated in the same way as the SAR estimates for coho, but include a term for incidental fishing mortality (Welch et al. 2021). We note that Chinook SAR estimates are not part of an official CTC product and are different from the commonly applied measure of early sea survival generated by ERA (also known as survival at age 2( 3)). The CTC’s early estimate of marine survival specifically calculates survival before chinook are caught in fisheries, and we chose to use the SAR estimate instead for consistency with our coho SAR estimates. Additionally, since pathogen-mediated mortality for some agents in our study is not well understood, we sought to avoid limiting the potential period of impact to the early marine phase. Although an important feature of the early marine survival estimate is that it accounts for natural mortality, the SAR estimate we used and the early marine survival estimate are highly correlated (for our dataset, R2= 0.81).
Associations between infectious agent prevalence and cohort survival were estimated as follows:

Log(SI)=β0,s(I)+β1,s(I)PDOI+β2,s(I)DPII+γthere(I)+ɛI

(1)

where SI is the cohort survival (SAR) for the observation I (an observation is a combination of CWT stock, season and year of ocean entry given a minimum sample size of ≥ 10 fish, to estimate pathogen prevalence; Supplementary Material 1, Tables S3, S4) , PDOI is the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, IAPI is the prevalence of infectious agents, γthere(I) is a random effect representing the variation in survival between years of ocean entry (there), and the index s indicates among CWT stocks the variation in the influence of PDO and IAP on survival (i.e., random intercept and slope). We treated IAPIour main predictor of interest, as a beta random variable to account for sampling error in the observations:

NOTI+

and

NOTI

are the number of positive and negative screening results, respectively, for salmon from the stock I. Adding 1 to both values ​​implies that this forward beta for IAPI is actually an update of a flat conjugate beta prior B(1,1), with

NOTI+

as the number of binomial successes and

(NOTI++NOTI)

as the number of trials that provide information about the IAPI (Bolker 2008). PDO is a representative variable of large-scale ocean temperature regimes that is often correlated with salmon marine survival (Rupp et al. 2012; Dale et al. 2017; Gosselin et al. 2018). The PDO has been standardized by centering and dividing by two standard deviations (Gelman 2008). We assumed a random slope for the PDO, varying by stock, because the PDO could have very different implications for a stock with marine culture in a relatively cold location (e.g., the west coast of Vancouver Island ) compared to another farm in a warm location (e.g., Strait of Georgia). We assumed a random slope for the prevalence of infectious agents, varying by stock, because evolution of the immune system and variation in resistance to certain pathogens is a known feature of local adaptation in salmonids (Ching 1984 Dionne et al. 2007; Wellband and Heath 2013). Note that for Chinook Salmon, we did not distinguish between oceanic and riverine life history types, but most CWT-CU pairings with adequate sample size (≥10 fish) were dominated by populations oceanic type (i.e. migrated seaward in their first year of life), except Atnarko, Nicola, Kitsumkalum and Stillaguamish (Fig. 1; Supplementary Material 1, Table S2 (all acronyms and names complete can be found here)). For coho, we assumed that all juveniles spent one year in fresh water before their first year at sea. A random interception for the stock was included to account for stock variation in survival (Zimmerman et al. 2015 ; Ruff et al. 2017) and a random intercept for the year of ocean entry was included to account for interannual variation in ocean conditions not represented by other model terms.

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Why Incoming Stock Jumped 14% Early Today https://coberm.net/why-incoming-stock-jumped-14-early-today/ Tue, 10 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/why-incoming-stock-jumped-14-early-today/ What happened Investors in Arrival (NASDAQ: ARVL) had a pleasant surprise on Tuesday morning when shares of the electric vehicle (EV) start-up soared as high as 14.1% at one point in early trading. Those gains quickly faded, however, as stock markets slipped into negative territory. The stock finish was barely in the green at 11:30 […]]]>

What happened

Investors in Arrival (NASDAQ: ARVL) had a pleasant surprise on Tuesday morning when shares of the electric vehicle (EV) start-up soared as high as 14.1% at one point in early trading.

Those gains quickly faded, however, as stock markets slipped into negative territory. The stock finish was barely in the green at 11:30 a.m. ET, but it helps to know what sent the penny stock so high.

So what

Arrival released its first quarter earnings report this morning. For a change, the embattled electric vehicle maker had good news to share with investors.

Image source: Getty Images.

Arrival posted a loss of just $10.4 million for the first quarter compared to a loss of nearly $1.1 billion a year ago. This massive turnaround alone sparked interest in the stock, but it seems the market quickly realized it wasn’t a turnaround after all.

Arrival’s huge losses last year were the result of one-time charges related to its reverse merger with a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) last year through which Arrival went public. Adjusting for these charges, Arrival’s adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) loss more than doubled year over year to $67 million in the first quarter.

For the full year, Arrival expects to see an adjusted EBITDA loss of $185 million to $225 million.

Now what

For Arrival’s investors right now, the company’s progress in its production and delivery times is far more important than any number. This is because Arrival has yet to manufacture and sell vehicles commercially, and unless the company reaches its first production and delivery milestones and generates its first revenue, investing in stock d’Arrival is only speculation.

From that perspective, Arrival tried to convince investors of its progress by announcing today that it plans to start production of its pickup trucks as well as public road testing for its buses in the third quarter. It plans to produce 400 to 600 pickup trucks this year. This is still well below the number of vehicle companies such as UPS have provisionally on order with arrival.

Incoming stock could increase if the company can hit those milestones, but it’s still a big ifand Arrival will have to do much more much faster to regain investor confidence.

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Civil society organizations should engage in early action planning for disasters and other crises https://coberm.net/civil-society-organizations-should-engage-in-early-action-planning-for-disasters-and-other-crises/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 20:42:15 +0000 https://coberm.net/civil-society-organizations-should-engage-in-early-action-planning-for-disasters-and-other-crises/ The National Focal Point in Ghana for the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR), Ms. Grace Commey, called on civil society organizations and other stakeholders to engage in planning for early actions to minimize the impact of extreme weather and climate events. She said so during a workshop hosted virtually by […]]]>

The National Focal Point in Ghana for the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR), Ms. Grace Commey, called on civil society organizations and other stakeholders to engage in planning for early actions to minimize the impact of extreme weather and climate events.

She said so during a workshop hosted virtually by the network on Tuesday, April 26, for civil society organizations and other stakeholders in Ghana.

The workshop was organized to train civil society organizations and other stakeholders on “early action planning” in the event of a disaster.

During the workshop, she recommended that contingency planning be a prerequisite for governments and humanitarian organizations to ensure rapid and effective assistance to those most in need, both upstream and in the event of a disaster.

However, she identified several factors that make advance preparation difficult for communities and civil society organizations.

These factors include; difficult access to know-how to use available forecasting information to access and predict the future, close stakeholder involvement which limits company engagement, limited use of community micro-grants to enable community responses to disasters and finally, the weakness or non-existence of emergency planning platforms.

She also recommended innovative approaches that foster local engagement in addressing the root causes of disasters and long-term crises. The first is the implementation of early warning systems to stimulate early actions and contingency plans.

She said that “forecasting experts should be engaged at the local level to support the process of developing local impact tables and defining potential trigger indicators based on locally available information, including warning systems. early community”.

This, she said, will identify and strengthen gaps and weaknesses in forecasting services in coordination with relevant agencies.

She also recommended that contingency planning, whether at the national, local or community level, be an inclusive and participatory process that engages all first responders. According to her, this will encourage ownership and responsibility among community members and other stakeholders.

This will also ensure effective communication of plans and will also help consider available capacities for early community-led action and response.

Ms. Grace Commey called for the establishment of collective cash transfer mechanisms for local preparedness, anticipatory action and disaster response. She also called for the strengthening and establishment of local platforms connected to national platforms.

She foresees a partnership in the near future between the Ghana chapter of the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR) and Diakonie Katastropenhife to implement such initiatives in Ghana.

By Martha Osei-Bobie

Send your news to newsghana101@gmail.com and via WhatsApp to +233 244244807
To follow Ghana News on Google News

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Early voting begins Thursday in Surry https://coberm.net/early-voting-begins-thursday-in-surry/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 19:35:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/early-voting-begins-thursday-in-surry/ April 25, 2022 In Surry County, concerns over the 2020 election have been reignited and coupled with rhetoric so strong it is making national headlines. Last Monday, a group of eight people expressed concerns during a door-to-door visit they conducted using 2020 voter records. They told county commissioners they were finding and hearing from repeated […]]]>

In Surry County, concerns over the 2020 election have been reignited and coupled with rhetoric so strong it is making national headlines.

Last Monday, a group of eight people expressed concerns during a door-to-door visit they conducted using 2020 voter records. They told county commissioners they were finding and hearing from repeated allegations of voter fraud and wanted to bring the matter before the board to their attention.

Complaints are summarized as voter registration irregularities, vote totals that do not match expected population figures, fears of voting machines, a desire to revert to a paper ballot, as well as a ballot mail-in ballot that never happened. The group also wants what it calls a forensic audit done on the 2020 election to include a full inspection of all voting materials.

Reuters News Service reported over the weekend that Surry County Republican Party Chairman Keith Senter “told Chief Electoral Officer Michella Huff he would make sure she lost her job if she refused her request for access to the county’s vote tabulators, the North Carolina State Board of Elections said in written responses to questions from Reuters,” the news service wrote. “Senter was “aggressive, threatening and hostile,” in two meetings with Huff, the state board of elections said, citing testimony.”

“We just had a difference of opinion,” Huff said Monday of those two meetings in March with Senter about his concerns and his desire to look inside the voting machines. “That’s just not how it works in North Carolina.”

She gave Senter and Dr. Douglas Franks avenues of recourse if they found errors in the canvassing, and that her office would immediately investigate all voter challenge forms. She also informed them that any allegations of fraud should be dealt with by the state board of elections.

Senter said Huff’s office told him an audit had been done, but he countered that only a recount had been done. If there were erroneous data, counting the same data sets again would produce no difference.

“If you line up ten apples, and five of them are wooden, you still have ten apples, but five of them are fake. It’s the same with votes, you can count the votes again and again and get the same result. What if five of them are fraudulent? »

Mark Payne, a solicitor retained by Surry County, submitted the following to the Board of Elections on April 20: “To date, the only specific query/request made is a request for a ‘forensic audit’. It should be noted here that there is no legal definition of a “forensic audit” and due to the colloquial use of this term nationally, at present the request is vague . »

There is a common thread of mistrust in voting machines that permeates voter fraud arguments. A county elected official said they were told a microchip or modem inside would have caused the election results. “There was a problem with the internet connections, that’s what I heard Mike Lindell say,” said solicitor Suzanne Richards. Lindell is the CEO of My Pillow Inc., and also a well-known conservative activist who has insisted that President Trump did not lose the 2020 presidential election.

“The voting machines and systems used in North Carolina are secure and have been certified to meet federal and state standards. Under state law, they cannot be connected to the internet and do not contain modems despite widespread misinformation,” Huff said in response.

“No electoral system or voting system in North Carolina has ever been the target of a successful cyberattack. Every piece of voting equipment is tested before each election, and the results are verified afterwards. Bipartisan teams participate in every step of the process, and the public can observe pre-election testing and post-election audits. We are happy to provide additional information on these topics if the parties so desire,” she wrote on Thursday.

There was a request for access to the voting machine by canvassers, to which Payne offers: “Under North Carolina election law, it is neither legal nor proper to authorize anyone other than election staff authorized to have physical access to the machines.”

He said the law forbids it and that allowing such access would void the warranty on the machines, resulting in the decertification of some or all of the county’s voting machines. “This will expose commissioners and ratepayers to significant financial loss to purchase new voting machines or recertify current machines.”

Kevin Shinault pointed out what he called “statistical improbabilities and statistical impossibilities”. He said in Surry County that “everyone over 80 is registered to vote, it’s a statistical impossibility if you know the math”.

Huff replied, “We would like to ask where the voter information over 80 was and the methodology used in this claim. Such claims often derive from comparing registered voters of a certain age with the voting-age population in a county, as reported by the US Census Bureau for a different time period. Comparison of these data is not statistically or mathematically sound.

John Bose summed it up like this: “I know the heat is on, but I beg you to have some courage. We do not trust the electoral process. He, along with other speakers, offered stories of veterans, freedom and sacrifice to set the tone before dispensing with serious allegations of voter fraud.

“When we got there for practice, they started with a video, and it was nothing but graves of men who had died for someone like me,” Shannon Senter said. . She mentioned the sacrifice of her own ancestors which gave her the right to speak to the council.

“They sacrificed themselves, and I never want to forget that. This is what gives me freedom. I thought about my grandchild and what I will say to him when he lives in tyranny in 20 years and does not have the freedoms that I have.

“What I would like to address is the door-to-door canvassing that is happening right now,” Huff continued. “We, the Board of Elections, and staff want to remind voters that we would never go door to door asking voters for information about any election activity. These people are not election officials. We would ask any voter to ask the canvasser to verify their identity and organization.

Canvassers told council they had data-driven stops and weren’t just going door-to-door. Also, they said the casual citizen may have offered who they voted for in 2020, but it wasn’t asked and it wasn’t their mission to find out.

“Most people thanked us and said it was long overdue,” Paula Stanley shared of her door-to-door experience.

Gayle Norman echoed this: “I took a different route, but the end result was the same. We have seniors who say they voted in person when our newspapers show an absentee/mail-in ballot.

“To date, we have not received any evidence or clarification regarding this second-hand account, so we have no way of verifying it or responding,” Huff said.

A specific complaint from a traveling nurse who asked twice and never received her mail-in ballot while out of state caught Huff’s attention. “My vote has been taken away from me, I’m crazy,” Ms Bose told the commissioners. A US Air Force veteran, she said she tracked her application for an absentee ballot online and when she saw her first ballot never arrived, she requested one another – which also did not happen.

Not having been able to vote is understandably upsetting, especially for an armed forces veteran. “We are concerned if she requested a ballot, was eligible and did not receive one. To our knowledge, no one has contacted the county board of elections about this,” Huff said.

Huff continued, “My number one focus is the current election which we are actively working on day and night. I want to assure all voters in Surry County that the security of election equipment is a priority for this office and that any complaints about the validity of our equipment are taken seriously.

“I do not want voters in Surry County walking out of a precinct without voting after registering and being given a ballot due to vote tabulator misinformation. If a voter wishes to call our office regarding any voting process, I encourage them to call our office.

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Caregiver parenting practices, dietary diversity knowledge and association with early childhood development outcomes among children aged 18-29 months in Zanzibar, Tanzania: a cross-sectional survey | BMC Public Health https://coberm.net/caregiver-parenting-practices-dietary-diversity-knowledge-and-association-with-early-childhood-development-outcomes-among-children-aged-18-29-months-in-zanzibar-tanzania-a-cross-sectional-survey/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 11:10:06 +0000 https://coberm.net/caregiver-parenting-practices-dietary-diversity-knowledge-and-association-with-early-childhood-development-outcomes-among-children-aged-18-29-months-in-zanzibar-tanzania-a-cross-sectional-survey/ Setting In 2006, Zanzibar expanded access to pre-school education with a mandate of pre-school education for all, although in 2015 still less than half of Zanzibar’s children had access to pre-school education. [28]. Despite these initiatives to increase access to early learning, programs focused on development during the critical window of the first 3 years […]]]>

Setting

In 2006, Zanzibar expanded access to pre-school education with a mandate of pre-school education for all, although in 2015 still less than half of Zanzibar’s children had access to pre-school education. [28]. Despite these initiatives to increase access to early learning, programs focused on development during the critical window of the first 3 years of life have gone unaddressed. In response, the Zanzibar Ministry of Health (MOH) and Ministry of Local Government (Office of the President, Regional Government and Local Government and Special Departments [PORALGSD]) launched the National Community Health Strategy 2019-2025, which formalized a cadre of over 2,000 community health volunteers (CHVs) under the national health system with the creation of the Jamii ni Afya (“Communities are health”). The program aims to improve early childhood development outcomes by targeting promotion, access and utilization of health care services, improved nutrition and nurturing caregiver interactions for children in utero through at age 5 and is built around the WHO/UNICEF nurturing care framework. [13] and supported by a digital system co-developed with D-tree International.

Survey frame and participants

We conducted a nationally representative cross-sectional household survey in February 2019 in all 11 districts of Zanzibar, Tanzania. We used two-stage cluster sampling to randomly select 50 clusters using probability proportional to size. The clusters and respective populations were defined by enumeration areas provided by the Office of the Chief Government Statistician. We then used systematic random sampling within each group to identify and recruit 10 child-caregiver pairs into each group, for a total sample of 500 participant pairs. Pairs of eligible participants included children aged 18 to 29 months, whose birth dates were verified from their health cards, and the child’s primary caregiver. Both the carer and the child had to have their primary residence in Zanzibar. No other exclusion criteria were applied. Therefore, the sample is representative of the whole of Zanzibar, with all eligible children equally likely to be selected to participate. Notably, this cross-sectional study is taking place as part of a larger study to compare detailed Caregiver-Reported Early Development Index (CREDI) scores at baseline to future survey implementations planned for 2023. and beyond. Power and sample size considerations for this larger study are provided in the Supplementary Materials (see Supplement 1).

Data collection procedures

In-home interviews with primary caregivers of eligible and enrolled children were conducted by trained data collectors in February 2019. The study questionnaire lasted approximately 40 minutes and was administered in Kiswahili. The tool was previously translated and tested in Kiswahili in Tanzania by the tool developers. Data was collected on tablets and smartphones using ODK Collect. Data collectors and field supervisors were independent from the Ministry of Health and collaborating organizations and participated in a 5-day training on ethical considerations, survey methodology and administration of all data collection tools. data before data collection.

Measures

The primary outcome measure was the Child Development Score as measured by the CREDI tool, which is based on caregiver reporting of easily observable and understandable child milestones and behaviors by age group. The tool has been validated in 17 low-, middle- and high-income countries, including Tanzania [29, 30]. We report z-scores and scaled raw scores by linguistic, cognitive, motor, and socio-emotional domain because z-scores are best used for comparison with other populations, and scaled scores are most suitable for linear regression. On both measures, higher scores represent greater achievement in child development outcomes. Although the CREDI was not developed as a tool for diagnosing delays in individual children, we have established a threshold to define “developmental problem” for comparison with the reference population and ease of communication. for policy and advocacy. We follow the conventions of other development assessment tools [31, 32] consider a z-score of 1 to < 2 standard deviations below the mean as a “developmental problem” and a “significant developmental problem” equal to a z-score of 2 or more standard deviations below the mean. Since this is a standard normal distribution, we would expect 13.5% of the children to be in the “developmental problem” group. Similarly, we would expect 2.5% of children to have a “significant developmental problem”. In accordance with CREDI guidelines, CREDI z-scores were used for descriptive analysis, while the continuous score was used for all hypothesis testing. [33].

Our primary exposure variables of interest were caregiver reports of interactions with the child in the form of early stimulating activities and caregiver knowledge of dietary diversity. The questions were taken from the UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) questionnaire. Caregiver report of interactions with child was analyzed as a continuous variable defined as the total number of early stimulating activities a child engaged in with a caregiver in the past 3 days. Types of early stimulating activities included: reading or looking at picture books, telling stories, singing songs, getting out of the house, playing a game, or naming/counting/drawing together. Knowledge of dietary diversity was the number of food groups the caregiver reported as appropriate for the child to eat, and knowledge of feeding frequency was the number of times per day the caregiver reported that the child should be fed. For the diet questions, we modified the MICS questions to reflect knowledge rather than practice, as the latter was not feasible for implementation. Variables were categorized as those who named four or more food groups versus those who named fewer, and those who named the diet three or more times a day versus those who suggested fewer. Knowledge of feeding practices was only assessed in a subgroup of still-breastfed children aged 18–23 months (not = 122).

We also collected data on individual- and household-level covariates related to home environment, caregiver engagement and play, disciplinary practices, care-seeking behaviors, and health care knowledge and practices. of health and nutrition. All questions and indicators were defined and assessed using standard UNICEF indicators from MICS and a standardized monitoring and evaluation tool for the Care for Child Development checklist. UNICEF. We measured sociodemographic characteristics relevant to understanding the relationship between our independent exposures of interest and child development outcomes. Wealth was measured using the Tanzania EquityTool (https://www.equitytool.org/), a validated tool that analyzes household wealth using a simplified version of the asset-based DHS questionnaire . Using the standard EquityTool analysis package, each household was assigned a score and then ranked according to its relative wealth against the quintile levels established by the population of Tanzania’s 2015 DHS.

statistical analyzes

We performed descriptive analyzes of overall and domain-specific CREDI z-scores and compared them to the CREDI reference population.Footnote 1, using the CREDI scoring package developed in R V3.6.0 (R Core Team, Vienna, Austria). To explore associations between individual-level covariates and global and domain-specific continuous CREDI scores (hereafter: child development outcomes), we performed bivariate analyzes for all categorical variables using Wald’s t-test and ANOVA. We fitted two multivariate linear regressions to quantify the relationship between the number of early stimulation activities and child developmental outcomes, and knowledge of adequate dietary diversity and child developmental outcomes. In both models, we adjusted for known confounding variables and those found to have a significant association in bivariate analysis (at the α = 0.05 level of significance), including: geographic region, caregiver age, child’s age and sex, whether the caregiver is married or living with their partner or not, maternal and paternal education levels, parity, wealth, whether the child has been left alone for longer than an hour in the past week, and (for caregiver engagement only) whether the caregiver believed domestic violence was justifiable in any circumstance. We took clustering into account using the svyset function on Stata. Our primary sampling unit was the enumeration area, and each individual was weighted by the probability of selection within its cluster. All tables and regression analyzes take into account the survey sample design, our standard errors have been adjusted accordingly. Given the difficulty of interpreting significant changes in the scaled raw CREDI score, we standardized the results of our multivariate model analysis. To do this, we divided the coefficient of the model-estimated CREDI outcome variable by the standard deviation within the study population for the specific CREDI domain, to express the effect size as a change in l standard deviation among the study population. Except for CREDI scoring, all statistical analyzes were performed using Stata Version 14 (StataCorp, College Station, TX).

Ethics statement

Ethical approval to conduct this study was obtained from the Institutional Review Boards of the Ministry of Health/Zanzibar Health Research Institute (Ref No.: ZAHREC/01/DEC/2018) and Boston Children’s Hospital (ref. no.: P00029981). Each child’s parent or primary caregiver provided written informed consent on behalf of the child-caregiver pair prior to study enrollment, and all research was conducted in accordance with approved study procedures and ethical guidelines. .

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Saudi stocks slide in early trading even as oil gains: Opening bell https://coberm.net/saudi-stocks-slide-in-early-trading-even-as-oil-gains-opening-bell/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/saudi-stocks-slide-in-early-trading-even-as-oil-gains-opening-bell/ LOS ANGELES: When China banned bitcoin mining last year, it sparked a gold rush in American cryptocurrencies, with states such as New York, Kentucky and Georgia quickly becoming centers major mines, according to Reuters. New York State Assemblyman Clyde Vanel couldn’t be happier. “It’s a blessing that it’s happening here,” he said, pointing to the […]]]>

LOS ANGELES: When China banned bitcoin mining last year, it sparked a gold rush in American cryptocurrencies, with states such as New York, Kentucky and Georgia quickly becoming centers major mines, according to Reuters.

New York State Assemblyman Clyde Vanel couldn’t be happier.

“It’s a blessing that it’s happening here,” he said, pointing to the jobs the industry could create.

But fellow Assemblywoman Anna Kelles is pushing for legislation that would severely restrict energy-intensive mining in New York, placing a moratorium on new mining operations that bring new energy sources online. fossil.

“We have an industry that will soon derail our climate goals,” she warned.

Debate over the environmental impact of bitcoin mining is heating up in the United States, with major environmental groups belatedly mounting a national pressure campaign criticizing its use of fossil fuels as the country tries to cut emissions to meet climate change goals.

Bitcoin miners maintain the decentralized digital currency through a network of power-hungry computers – whose exact power consumption and carbon footprint are difficult to measure.

A 2021 estimate from industry group CoinShare found the network was responsible for less than a tenth of a percent of global emissions, while a separate report from New York Digital Investment Group said it could reach at most 1. % of global emissions by 2030. .

But a study published by economist Alex de Vries, a persistent critic of bitcoin’s energy consumption, in the energy journal Joul in March estimated that it produced the carbon dioxide equivalent of the nation of Greece.

“We should be pushing bitcoin mining to decarbonize, like any other industry,” said Margot Paez, a climate change scientist at the Bitcoin Policy Institute, a think tank.

“But the reality is that, compared to other industries, bitcoin uses an insignificant amount of energy,” she said.

Bitcoin boosters say that other activities – such as running Christmas lights – consume roughly equivalent amounts of power as the network, and that bitcoin’s social function is worth the energy charge.

They also point to a few operations powered by renewable energy, particularly in Texas, where solar and wind farms are coming online to power bitcoin mining.

But in places like New York and Pennsylvania, miners have revived shuttered fossil-fuel power plants to fuel their work — and environmental groups have stepped up.

“We are in a climate crisis,” said Tefere Gebre, Program Director of Greenpeace USA at a recent press conference hosted by environmental groups critical of cryptocurrency.

And bitcoin mining, he said, is “pushing us in the wrong direction at the wrong time.”

New York regulations

Legislation drafted by New York Assemblyman Kelles, who quit the state’s Natural Resources Committee in March, would impose a moratorium on new fossil fuel-powered bitcoin operations.

If passed, “New York will signal that it is closed for business,” said Kyle Schneps, director of public policy at New York-based bitcoin and advisory firm Foundry, which opposes the bill.

The fight against bitcoin mining in New York City began last year when residents of the small town of Torrey protested when a bitcoin mining company took over a closed coal-fired power plant and converted it into a a natural gas-fired mine.

Environmental group Earth Justice has identified a number of other factories in the state that it says could undergo similar conversions – and lawmaker Kelles has rallied more than 40 co-sponsors for legislation that would ban a such activity.

Schneps, with Foundry, noted that some bitcoin mines are powered by renewable energy, including hydroelectricity, and can bring economic benefits.

His own company has hired more than 115 employees in New York, working in a range of roles from software engineering to sales, he said.

New York Assemblyman Vanel, who opposes the mining moratorium, fears it will scare away miners, saying lawmakers should work with industry to address any environmental concerns.

But Kelles said that without regulations prohibiting fossil fuel-powered bitcoin mining, more dirty power plants would come back online in the state, jeopardizing its emissions reduction goals.

“Let’s pause on that now,” she said. “We spent 30 years removing these dirty factories from the network.”

Scientists say global fossil fuel emissions must fall by 45% by 2030 to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, including ever more dangerous wildfires, floods and heat waves.

But despite legions of emission reduction pledges, carbon pollution continues to rise, with the United Nations predicting a 16% rise by 2030, compared to 2010 levels, even though current government plans in reducing carbon emissions are met.

Those on both sides of the bitcoin divide agree that what happens in New York will have implications across the United States.

“When it comes to climate policy nationally, New York is a powerful player,” said Mandy DeRoche, an attorney at Earth Justice, who is now suing to block the expansion of Torrey’s bitcoin mine on grounds environmental.

code fight

The confrontation in New York coincides with a nationwide campaign by major environmental groups, including the Environmental Working Group and Greenpeace USA, to draw attention to bitcoin’s environmental impact.

The groups are calling for changes to Bitcoin’s software code to replace its “proof-of-work” protocol – which generates new coins and maintains the network by running power-hungry computers – with a “proof-of-stake” mechanism at low emissions that would reward those who already own the currency.

The campaign, which received major advertisements in national newspapers, was launched with a $5 million donation from Chris Larsen, co-founder of cryptocurrency Ripple.

“We are deadly serious about this. This problem needs to be addressed,” said Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group.

He said the mainstream environmental movement had been slow to recognize the threat of bitcoin mining, but groups are now shifting into high gear.

“We’re on the way to a good transition ‘away from fossil fuels,’ he said — but fossil fuel-powered bitcoin mining “could really offset that transition in a very significant way.”

Paez of the Bitcoin Policy Institute opposes carbon-based bitcoin mining, but said critics fail to understand that mining does not inherently defeat climate goals, pointing out that US mining operations are funding new wind and solar generation.

Gloria Zhao, a developer who works on the bitcoin system’s core software, said the mining community has “basically treated as a joke” proposals from environmentalists to modify the bitcoin software, in part because they didn’t been submitted through a formal mechanism.

Zhao and other bitcoin proponents say the cryptocurrency’s energy-intensive design is important for maintaining network security and decentralization, which allows anyone with access to a computer and electricity to participate.

But Larsen, who funded the environmental campaign, said that as more traditional financial institutions invest in bitcoin, pressure will increase on software developers to align the cryptocurrency with environmental goals, governance (ESG) issues.

“This will put pressure on the core developers to make this change,” he said. “That’s the point.”

—Thomson Reuters Foundation

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Researchers explore homelessness in Nova Scotia during early months of COVID-19 https://coberm.net/researchers-explore-homelessness-in-nova-scotia-during-early-months-of-covid-19/ Wed, 06 Apr 2022 09:00:51 +0000 https://coberm.net/researchers-explore-homelessness-in-nova-scotia-during-early-months-of-covid-19/ The authors of a new report highlighting the “ongoing systemic catastrophe” of homelessness in Nova Scotia during the early months of the pandemic hope their work will inform future disaster response. The report, Homelessness During a Pandemic, Learning Lessons for Disaster Preparedness in Nova Scotia, summarizes a collaborative study between researchers from Dalhousie University, Cape […]]]>

The authors of a new report highlighting the “ongoing systemic catastrophe” of homelessness in Nova Scotia during the early months of the pandemic hope their work will inform future disaster response.

The report, Homelessness During a Pandemic, Learning Lessons for Disaster Preparedness in Nova Scotia, summarizes a collaborative study between researchers from Dalhousie University, Cape Breton University and the University of Toronto.

It was released by the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives – Nova Scotia (CCPA-NS) on Wednesday.

Protesters during the police eviction of a homeless encampment at the Old Memorial Library in Halifax, August 18, 2021. Photo: Tim Bousquet/Halifax Examiner

“While this study describes events, actions and lived experiences during COVID-19, the story, the underlying rationale, is that homelessness itself is stigmatizing, dehumanizing, unforgiving and disastrous and leads to such devastating consequences,” the report said.

“COVID-19, for the most part, amplified the suffering of being homeless. Overall, almost all homeless participants reported experiencing a decline in physical and mental health during the initial stages of the pandemic.

The study focused on homelessness in Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) and Cape Breton Regional Municipality (CBRM). It included interviews with 28 people experiencing homelessness and 24 people working in the housing and homelessness sector.

It captured a snapshot of the sector during the early months of the pandemic, with data collection taking place between February and mid-April 2020. The report outlines the key findings of the study and recommendations from homeless people and service providers.

“In the streets when the world has gone out”

“We had to create portraits and witnesses of this incredible event that happened, called the pandemic, and there is so little attention or understanding from the homelessness sector,” said Jeff Karabanow, professor at the Dalhousie University School of Social Work and co-author of the report.

“I think that was a big chunk, to be able to create a portrait, just a sliver of life, of what it was like to be on the streets when the world stopped.”

A bearded man, his head tilted slightly to the side, stares thoughtfully off camera as if listening to someone.

Jeff Karabanow, professor in the School of Social Work at Dalhousie University and co-author of the report. Picture: Contributed

Karabanow said one of the things that struck him while preparing the report was finding out how homeless the abandoned people were feeling during the pandemic.

“We’ve always had a pretty forgotten sector, but all the edicts that came from public health were, ‘Stay home, wash your hands, wear a mask,'” Karabanow said.

“We completely ignored a population that couldn’t go home, that couldn’t wear a mask all the time, that was out of the loop, that didn’t have the communication mechanisms, and when the world shut down, she was really, really let down.”

Karabanow said he was surprised by the number of service actors who highlighted the deep partnerships and collaboration that served as a major platform for providing support to homeless people during the pandemic.

However, there were inequalities in the availability and deployment of services in CBRM compared to HRM. The authors heard that it seemed to take longer to negotiate programs and resources in Cape Breton, and many felt that supports were not coming out of HRM.

“The lesson learned is that all levels of government need to respond more quickly during disasters and the province needs to ensure resources and responses are equally available across Nova Scotia,” the report said.

Karabanow said this was particularly noteworthy and became one of the main findings of the report.

“We know that homelessness, housing dynamics, layers of poverty, systemic discrimination, are not just rooted in human resource management,” Karabanow said.

“There are enormous levels of suffering in Nova Scotia and we have tended to overlook rurality as a major social determinant of health. And by ignoring it, we now realize that we have really missed the mark in providing adequate supports to all regions of the province.

“Lost and alone during the pandemic”

Several participants in the CBRM study told researchers that there was a need for more shelter beds in Sydney, but also in smaller towns like Sydney Mines and North Sydney.

“We should have more, like opening up more shelters, more spaces where people can go and feel safe instead of living on the streets freezing to death or having to live in a rat-infested rudeness. There was nothing,” said a traveling participant from Cape Breton.

The study found that almost all homeless participants highlighted the need for more counseling and mental health services for people in crisis, as well as programs and supports.

During those early months of the pandemic, when researchers interviewed them, they often just wanted to talk to someone.

“They could have provided a program or something to teach people and especially drug addicts how to cope, deal with loss and loneliness during the pandemic, you know what I mean,” said one participant.

“Yeah, that’s what I think would have been better for a lot of people. Advice would have been better, but nobody wanted to do it because of the pandemic, nobody wanted to talk to us. »

“Rethinking what housing really means”

Karabanow said that because homelessness was “a disaster” and the sector was “fundamentally forgotten” long before the emergence of COVID-19, the pandemic and the ongoing housing crisis have further underscored how much we have failed by not investing enough in this pre-pandemic population.

“We have the talent and the wisdom of great NGOs, caring government officials in this sector, incredible outreach people, housing people, social workers,” he said.

“We have this talent. I think it’s not just about supply, it’s about rethinking what housing actually means.

Among the successes that have emerged from the pandemic, Karabanow points to the initiatives that have surfaced and the collaboration between players in the sector. He described the many frontline service providers as unsung heroes, noting that they had no track record and were allowed to think outside the box.

“The money, the federal funding, could roll in pretty quickly because we had to figure out how to ward off this virus in marginal populations,” he said.

Some of these off-the-beaten-track initiatives included the emergence of a harm reduction model, a public health hotline, and toilet blocks.

“All people’s ideas of how you can create compassionate, caring, and extremely urgent supports,” he said. “And even though it’s a band-aid, you know, they were so important to what people were going through during the pandemic.”

When the next disaster strikes

To make the information more accessible, the researchers also worked with local host Shannon Long to create a short animated video that captures some of the study’s important findings. This video can be found here.

The report concluded with the voices of homeless people sharing the supports and services they believe would be most beneficial. They included:

  • universal basic income
  • increased addictions services and harm reduction programs
  • mental health supports
  • places where people experiencing homelessness can have coffee and chat
  • increased access to housing
  • help finding a job
  • increased communication around the evolution of the pandemic, public health restrictions and availability of services

“What I hope is that we will be careful as civil society and mainly as members of government in the next disaster. That we don’t expect everyone to have the same opportunities and resources to follow the protocols put in place,” Karabanow said.

“I think we have to be careful with our language, we have to be careful with policies and procedures. We must remember that civil society is made up of all the great diversity of people.


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