Early response http://coberm.net/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 03:01:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://coberm.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13-120x120.png Early response http://coberm.net/ 32 32 Early Warnings for All initiative gains momentum – World https://coberm.net/early-warnings-for-all-initiative-gains-momentum-world/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 01:11:51 +0000 https://coberm.net/early-warnings-for-all-initiative-gains-momentum-world/ Countries commit to action at UN General Assembly ministerial meeting New York, 21 September 2022 (WMO) – Momentum is building to implement a plan to ensure that every person on Earth is protected by an early warning system over the next five years, seizing the one of the most effective “low hanging fruits” of climate […]]]>

Countries commit to action at UN General Assembly ministerial meeting

New York, 21 September 2022 (WMO) – Momentum is building to implement a plan to ensure that every person on Earth is protected by an early warning system over the next five years, seizing the one of the most effective “low hanging fruits” of climate change adaptation.

Ministers gathered in New York on September 21 on the sidelines of the 77th UN General Assembly High Level Week to pledge support for the UN’s Early Warnings for All initiative as an urgent measure climate adaptation.

Organized by the United Nations, the Egyptian government and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the ministerial event on early warnings for climate adaptation brought together countries from around the world, donors, international development agencies and the private sector. The event was organized by the Permanent Mission of Finland to the United Nations in New York.

“We must ensure that every person, community and nation has access to effective early warning systems over the next five years,” UN Secretary-General António Guterres said during the session. opening of the United Nations General Assembly on September 20. “It is high time to move beyond the endless discussions. Vulnerable countries need meaningful action,” he said.

Mr. Guterres asked WMO to present a roadmap to the UN climate change conference, COP27, in Egypt in November to carry out the rescue campaign. COP27 will shift the focus from promises and commitments to action on the ground.

“One in three people in the world, mostly in small island developing states and least developed countries, and six in ten people in Africa do not have access to effective early warning systems. This is why the Secretary-General has called for a global plan to ensure universal coverage of early warning systems over the next five years. We have the technological tools and the financial resources to achieve this. Protecting the lives and safeguarding the livelihoods of those on the front lines of the climate crisis must be a collective global responsibility,” said Assistant Secretary-General for Climate Action Selwin Hart.

An estimated 3.3 to 3.6 billion people live in situations highly vulnerable to climate change. Over the past 50 years (1970-2019), a weather, climate or water-related disaster has taken the lives of 115 people per day and caused $202 million in losses per day. The number of recorded disasters has increased fivefold, partly due to human-induced climate change and more extreme weather.

A testament to the success of early warnings, the number of lives lost has nearly tripled over the past 50 years thanks to better weather forecasting and proactive, coordinated disaster management.

“The statistics speak for themselves,” said WMO Secretary-General Professor Petteri Taalas. “Early warning systems are a proven, effective and feasible climate adaptation measure that saves lives and money. We can and must reach the most vulnerable and ensure they translate into rapid action.

Effective climate adaptation tool

The Sixth Assessment Report on Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recognized early warning systems as one of the key adaptation options.

The Global Commission on Adaptation’s 2019 flagship report ‘Adapt Now’ found that early warning systems deliver a more than tenfold return on investment – the greatest of all the adaptation measures included in the report .

The report also revealed that just 24 hours of warning of an upcoming storm or heatwave can reduce the resulting damage by 30% and that spending US$800 million on such systems in countries in development would avoid losses of 3 to 16 billion dollars per year.

“Least developed countries are among the most vulnerable to climate change. We must accelerate efforts to help least developed countries adapt to new and future climate risks. Ensuring universal coverage of early warning systems is a essential first step on this path,” Eisehower said. Nduwa Mkaka, Minister of Natural Resources and Climate Change of Malawi and Chair of the LDC Group.

“Small islands are on the frontline of the climate crisis. We need the international community to deliver on its commitments to accelerate action on climate adaptation. Early warning systems save lives and prevent economic loss All small islands need to be protected with early warning systems as a matter of urgency,” said H.E. Molwyn Joseph, Minister of Health, Welfare and Environment of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Alliance for Small Island States.

Funding commitments

A range of innovative new and pre-existing financing solutions are needed to implement the plan to protect every person on Earth. These include a scale-up of the Climate Risk Early Warning Systems (CREWS) initiative, the Systematic Observations Funding Facility (SOFF) and Accelerated Climate Fund Investment Programs , such as the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and the Adaptation Fund.

CREWS already supports 75 countries and has received nearly $80 million in contributions since its launch in 2015, led by France.

“We need to go further and faster and we now aim to raise an additional $155 million by 2027,” said Chrysoula Zacharopoulou, Minister of State for Development, Francophonie and International Partnerships of France. She announced that France would double its annual contribution to CREWS, from 2023, to 8 million euros per year.

German Parliamentary State Secretary to the Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Bärbel Kofler, also expressed her commitment to CREWS and SOFF, one of the other core elements of the Early Warnings for All is SOFF initiative.

“Recognizing the urgent need for action, the Nordic Development Fund has made a substantial contribution to the Systematic Observation Funding Mechanism (SOFF) – a fundamental part of the United Nations Early Warning Systems Initiative. SOFF can fill gaps in basic weather and climate observations in the most vulnerable countries, leading to improved weather forecasts, early warning systems and climate information services. This can only be achieved through a collective international effort, and we look forward to seeing more countries join the United Nations SOFF Multi-Partner Trust Fund,” said Karin Isaksson, Managing Director of the Nordic Development Fund.

What is an early warning system?

A multi-hazard early warning system is an integrated system that lets people know that dangerous weather or climate events (floods, storms, heat waves) are on the way and informs people on how to act to minimize the impacts . End-to-end MHEWS includes risk awareness, observation, communication and response.

The practicality, implementation and universal political appeal of early warning systems make them an appropriate focus area for COP27.

HE President El-Sisi of Egypt recently stressed that turning pledges and commitments into implementation on the ground is a top priority of Egypt’s COP27 Presidency. President El-Sissi also stressed the need to improve the size, quality and mechanisms of climate finance available to developing countries, especially to help them adapt to the negative effects of climate change.

In this regard, the COP26 and COP27 Presidencies called on developed countries to follow through on their commitments made in Glasgow to at least double their climate finance for adaptation in developing countries by 2025, in the goal of achieving a balance between funding for adaptation and funding for mitigation.

COP26 President Alok Sharma highlighted the UK’s support for the Early Warning for All initiative. He said he was concerned that there was some “backsliding” on the climate commitments made in Glasgow. “It’s not acceptable,” he said.

WMO and its partners ensure that early warnings translate into rapid action and reach the last mile.

As a young indigenous woman, I welcome the UN Secretary-General’s call for early warning systems for all, led by WMO,” ​​said Ms. Archana Soreng, member of the Youth Advisory Group on climate change from the United Nations Secretary General. “Countries should prioritize early warning systems for all and ensure meaningful participation – at all levels of the process – and leadership roles for young people, indigenous and local communities and other marginalized communities who are the most affected by the climate crisis. I urge countries to ensure linguistic diversity in setting up early warning systems for all, so that we leave no one behind,” she said.

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The Early Warnings for All initiative is gaining momentum https://coberm.net/the-early-warnings-for-all-initiative-is-gaining-momentum/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 08:36:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/the-early-warnings-for-all-initiative-is-gaining-momentum/ Countries commit to action at UN General Assembly ministerial meeting New York, 21 September 2022 (WMO) – Momentum is building to implement a plan to ensure that every person on Earth is protected by an early warning system over the next five years, seizing the one of the most effective “low hanging fruits” of climate […]]]>

Countries commit to action at UN General Assembly ministerial meeting

New York, 21 September 2022 (WMO) – Momentum is building to implement a plan to ensure that every person on Earth is protected by an early warning system over the next five years, seizing the one of the most effective “low hanging fruits” of climate change adaptation.

Ministers gathered in New York on September 21 on the sidelines of the 77th UN General Assembly High Level Week to pledge support for the UN’s Early Warnings for All initiative as an urgent measure climate adaptation.

Organized by the United Nations, the Egyptian government and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the ministerial event on early warnings for climate adaptation brought together countries from around the world, donors, international development agencies and the private sector. The event was organized by the Permanent Mission of Finland to the United Nations in New York.

“We must ensure that every person, community and nation has access to effective early warning systems over the next five years,” UN Secretary-General António Guterres said during the session. opening of the United Nations General Assembly on September 20. “It is high time to move beyond the endless discussions. Vulnerable countries need meaningful action,” he said.

Mr. Guterres asked WMO to present a roadmap to the UN climate change conference, COP27, in Egypt in November to carry out the rescue campaign. COP27 will shift the focus from promises and commitments to action on the ground.

“One in three people in the world, mostly in small island developing states and least developed countries, and six in ten people in Africa do not have access to effective early warning systems. This is why the Secretary-General has called for a global plan to ensure universal coverage of early warning systems over the next five years. We have the technological tools and the financial resources to achieve this. Protecting the lives and preserving the livelihoods of those on the front lines of the climate crisis must be a collective global responsibility,” said Under Secretary General for Climate Action Selwin Hart.

An estimated 3.3 to 3.6 billion people live in situations highly vulnerable to climate change. Over the past 50 years (1970-2019), a weather, climate or water-related disaster has taken the lives of 115 people per day and caused $202 million in losses per day. The number of recorded disasters has increased fivefold, partly due to human-induced climate change and more extreme weather.

A testament to the success of early warnings, the number of lives lost has nearly tripled over the past 50 years thanks to better weather forecasting and proactive, coordinated disaster management.

“The statistics speak for themselves,” said WMO Secretary-General Professor Petteri Taalas. “Early warning systems are a proven, effective and feasible climate adaptation measure that saves lives and money. We can and must reach the most vulnerable and ensure they translate into rapid action.

Effective climate adaptation tool

The Sixth Assessment Report on Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recognized early warning systems as one of the key adaptation options.

The Global Commission on Adaptation’s 2019 flagship report ‘Adapt Now’ found that early warning systems deliver a more than tenfold return on investment – the greatest of all the adaptation measures included in the report .

The report also revealed that just 24 hours of warning of an upcoming storm or heatwave can reduce the resulting damage by 30% and that spending US$800 million on such systems in countries in development would avoid losses of 3 to 16 billion dollars per year.

“The least developed countries are among the most vulnerable to climate change. We must accelerate efforts to help least developed countries adapt to new and future climate risks. Ensuring universal coverage of early warning systems is an essential first step on this path,” said Eisehower Nduwa Mkaka, Malawi’s Minister of Natural Resources and Climate Change and Chair of the LDC Group.

“Small islands are on the front lines of the climate crisis. We need the international community to deliver on its commitments to accelerate action on climate change adaptation. Early warning systems save lives and prevent economic loss. All small islands urgently need to be protected by early warning systems,” said H.E. Molwyn Joseph, Minister of Health, Welfare and Environment of Antigua and Barbuda and President of the Alliance for Small Island States.

Funding commitments

A range of innovative new and pre-existing financing solutions are needed to implement the plan to protect every person on Earth. These include a scale-up of the Climate Risk Early Warning Systems (CREWS) initiative, the Systematic Observations Funding Facility (SOFF) and Accelerated Climate Fund Investment Programs , such as the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and the Adaptation Fund.

CREWS already supports 75 countries and has received nearly $80 million in contributions since its launch in 2015, led by France.

“We need to go further and faster and we now aim to raise an additional $155 million by 2027,” said Chrysoula Zacharopoulou, Minister of State for Development, Francophonie and International Partnerships of France. She announced that France would double its annual contribution to CREWS, from 2023, to 8 million euros per year.

German Parliamentary State Secretary to the Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Bärbel Kofler, also expressed her commitment to CREWS and SOFF, one of the other core elements of the Early Warnings for All is SOFF initiative.

“Recognizing the urgent need for action, the Nordic Development Fund has made a substantial contribution to the Systematic Observation Funding Mechanism (SOFF) – a fundamental part of the United Nations Early Warning Systems Initiative. SOFF can fill gaps in basic weather and climate observations in the most vulnerable countries, leading to improved weather forecasts, early warning systems and climate information services. This can only be achieved through a collective international effort, and we look forward to seeing more countries join the United Nations SOFF Multi-Partner Trust Fund,” said Karin Isaksson, Managing Director of the Nordic Development Fund.

What is an early warning system?

A multi-hazard early warning system is an integrated system that lets people know that dangerous weather or climate events (floods, storms, heat waves) are on the way and informs people on how to act to minimize the impacts . End-to-end MHEWS includes risk awareness, observation, communication and response.

The practicality, implementation and universal political appeal of early warning systems make them an appropriate focus area for COP27.

MHEWS

HE President El-Sisi of Egypt recently stressed that turning pledges and commitments into implementation on the ground is a top priority of Egypt’s COP27 Presidency. President El-Sissi also stressed the need to improve the size, quality and mechanisms of climate finance available to developing countries, especially to help them adapt to the negative effects of climate change.

In this regard, the COP26 and COP27 Presidencies called on developed countries to follow through on their commitments made in Glasgow to at least double their climate finance for adaptation in developing countries by 2025, in the goal of achieving a balance between funding for adaptation and funding for mitigation.

COP26 President Alok Sharma highlighted the UK’s support for the Early Warning for All initiative. He said he was concerned that there was some “backsliding” on the climate commitments made in Glasgow. “It’s not acceptable,” he said.

WMO and its partners ensure that early warnings translate into rapid action and reach the last mile.

As a young indigenous woman, I welcome the UN Secretary-General’s call for early warning systems for all, led by WMO,” ​​said Ms. Archana Soreng, member of the Youth Advisory Group on climate change from the United Nations Secretary General. “Countries should prioritize early warning systems for all and ensure meaningful participation – at all levels of the process – and leadership roles for young people, indigenous and local communities and other marginalized communities who are the most affected by the climate crisis. I urge countries to ensure linguistic diversity in setting up early warning systems for all, so that we leave no one behind,” she said.

United Nations General Assembly Ministerial Meeting Logo

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors. See in full here.

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Belonging starts with policy and practice: how the early inclusion of https://coberm.net/belonging-starts-with-policy-and-practice-how-the-early-inclusion-of/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 10:14:46 +0000 https://coberm.net/belonging-starts-with-policy-and-practice-how-the-early-inclusion-of/ Among the millions of people who have been forced to flee Ukraine, many are people with specific needs and vulnerabilities such as women, children, the elderly and people with disabilities. History and recent crisis experiences have taught the world an important lesson: while many people intend to return to their home countries, many cannot and […]]]>

Among the millions of people who have been forced to flee Ukraine, many are people with specific needs and vulnerabilities such as women, children, the elderly and people with disabilities. History and recent crisis experiences have taught the world an important lesson: while many people intend to return to their home countries, many cannot and will choose to stay.

Ensuring that newcomers – Ukrainians and third-country nationals – receive adequate support and services upon arrival and settling in their host country can prevent the long-term consequences of social exclusion of newcomers newcomers and subsequent generations. Investing in the inclusion of Ukrainians and responding early to the needs of host communities, for example in housing, employment, education, language, healthcare and social protection, is essential for the long-term success of integration policies. Without early support and planning, local actors may not be prepared to provide adequate services to newcomers, which can heighten social tensions and xenophobic sentiments.

IOM’s new toolkit brings together existing initiatives, tools and training to leverage, scale up and replicate the medium and long-term inclusion of newcomers. It also aims to inspire IOM missions, governments, civil society organizations and other partners on how to better prepare for and respond to the challenges of welcoming new arrivals and responding to their needs throughout the migration journey – which remains relevant beyond the Ukrainian crisis.

In line with the Global Compact for Migration, recognizing the skills, culture and new perspectives brought by Ukrainians and third-country nationals is key to harnessing innovation and empowering migrants and societies to achieve full inclusion and social cohesion.

Meeting the needs of millions of people fleeing Ukraine requires action beyond immediate and life-saving emergency assistance. IOM recognizes that investing in early inclusion measures can advance social cohesion and inclusion of affected populations in the medium to long term.

***

Download the toolkit on facilitating pathways to inclusive and cohesive societies.

For more information contact:

Ace Dela Cruz, Coordinator for Migrant Integration and Social Cohesion, IOM, Email: acedelacruz@iom.int

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Majority of underrepresented early-career scientists suffer from mental distress https://coberm.net/majority-of-underrepresented-early-career-scientists-suffer-from-mental-distress/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 16:18:39 +0000 https://coberm.net/majority-of-underrepresented-early-career-scientists-suffer-from-mental-distress/ PITTSBURGH, Pa. — Social unrest due to systemic racism is causing psychological distress among early-career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds, according to the new results from a research survey conducted by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh. Such distress is a red flag as academic institutions across the country strive to improve diversity. But less than […]]]>

PITTSBURGH, Pa. — Social unrest due to systemic racism is causing psychological distress among early-career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds, according to the new results from a research survey conducted by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh. Such distress is a red flag as academic institutions across the country strive to improve diversity.

But less than a third said social unrest had had a negative impact on their ability to work, and survey participants were more than twice as likely to say their mentoring relationships had had a positive impact rather than negative.

“Responses to open-ended survey questions gave the impression that people may have positive feelings about mentoring because they are starting to talk about the racial justice movement and getting affirmation of their feelings of from their mentors,” said Dr. Gretchen White, assistant professor in Pitt’s School of Medicine and lead author of the study, published in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Science.

White noted that previous studies have shown the importance of mentoring, when a more experienced person provides advice and support to a less experienced person, especially in the workplace.

“Our results reinforce the positive impact of mentoring,” she said. “But mentorship is not the only answer. I would be remiss if I did not point out the incredibly harmful effects of psychological distress. People may have found ways to deal with this stress at work, but we know that early career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds leave their careers disproportionately.

The survey was conducted as part of the Building Up a Diverse Biomedical Research Workforce (Building Up) trial, which is testing approaches, such as mentoring and networking, to improve the retention of early career researchers who are underrepresented in the health sciences, including people who identify as Black, Hispanic, or female, have a disability, or come from disadvantaged backgrounds.

A total of 144 early career researchers from 25 academic institutions participated in the survey; 80% were female, 35% were black and 40% Hispanic.

Following the survey, the researchers interviewed some participants to better understand the results.

“Many participants described work environments riddled with overt discrimination and isolation from other people of color,” White said. “I love science and research, but doing it in a work environment that is unsupportive and sometimes hostile is upsetting and stressful. Being inclusive and having diverse researchers, like myself and others, enhances science and discovery for the benefit of society as a whole.

– This press release was provided by the University of Pittsburgh

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Children with special needs receive support through the Early Stimulation Program – Magnetic Support https://coberm.net/children-with-special-needs-receive-support-through-the-early-stimulation-program-magnetic-support/ Sun, 21 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/children-with-special-needs-receive-support-through-the-early-stimulation-program-magnetic-support/ #Kingston, Jamaica, August 21, 2022 – Hundreds of children with special needs across the island received support through the Early Stimulation Program (ESP) last year. The intervention included the provision of developmental assistance, stimulation and therapy, assistive devices and educational support. As reported in the Jamaica Economic and Social Survey 2021, there were 888 referrals […]]]>

#Kingston, Jamaica, August 21, 2022 – Hundreds of children with special needs across the island received support through the Early Stimulation Program (ESP) last year.

The intervention included the provision of developmental assistance, stimulation and therapy, assistive devices and educational support.

As reported in the Jamaica Economic and Social Survey 2021, there were 888 referrals to ESP last year, with Kingston and St. Andrew recording the highest number at 400, followed by Portland, 84; St. Catherine, 77 years old; and St. James, 70.

At the end of the year, school enrollment stood at 701 children, including 458 boys and 243 girls.

Of the total registrants, Kingston and St, Andrew at 315, accounted for 44.9%, Portland and St. Catherine each had 66 children enrolled, while St. James had 46.

In all parishes, boys outnumbered girls among PSR beneficiaries.

“Parenting workshops, trainings and counseling sessions continued to be held to support parents and other caregivers, while the reach of the program was extended to the whole island through the use of a mobile response unit,” the survey states.

The document further indicates that a blended approach, involving physical interaction and virtual connections, has been used to maintain ESP activities as the pandemic drags on.

The provision of shadow carer assistance to children with special needs in the learning environment continued to receive support from the Special Education Unit of the Department of Education and Youth.

The survey also noted that aspects of motor dysfunction continued to be addressed through the purchase of adaptive equipment such as specialist wheelchairs, walkers, supports, special seats and other stimulation equipment.

Local development partners have played a critical role as sources of funding to support early intervention initiatives, thereby improving the quality of service delivered.

“Client diagnosis for cerebral palsy and language delays also benefited from access to adaptive aids,” the report said.

During the year, a total of 102 children moved from ESP to special education units or mainstream classes in the primary education system.

Some 2,514 intervention sessions were conducted as part of the community-based rehabilitation program using the blended approach of virtual meetings and physical contact time.

ESP is an early intervention program under the Department of Labor and Social Security for young children (0-6 years) with various types of developmental disabilities.

Among the disabilities managed by this program are cerebral palsy and other physical disabilities ranging from sensory impairment, autism, Down syndrome, developmental delay, secondary to psychosocial deprivation and comorbid behavioral problems, including including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder also known as (ADHD).

Contact: Latonya Linton

Version: JIS

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Syrian Civil Defense contributes to early recovery plan; conditions for carrying out this step https://coberm.net/syrian-civil-defense-contributes-to-early-recovery-plan-conditions-for-carrying-out-this-step/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 06:21:20 +0000 https://coberm.net/syrian-civil-defense-contributes-to-early-recovery-plan-conditions-for-carrying-out-this-step/ Enab Baladi – Lujain Mourad Despite the hazy vision regarding the early recovery phase in Syria, the Syrian Civil Defense emerged as the first to pursue recovery projects in northern Syria. But this effort is interspersed with fears that Russia and the Syrian regime will exploit this phase. Discussions on early recovery plans come after […]]]>

Enab Baladi – Lujain Mourad

Despite the hazy vision regarding the early recovery phase in Syria, the Syrian Civil Defense emerged as the first to pursue recovery projects in northern Syria. But this effort is interspersed with fears that Russia and the Syrian regime will exploit this phase.

Discussions on early recovery plans come after the UN Security Council renewed Resolution No. 2585 on the delivery of aid through the Bab al-Hawa border crossing between Syria and Turkey to 12 months in two phases, each of six months.

The resolution included a clause welcoming all efforts and initiatives aimed at expanding humanitarian activities in Syria, including early recovery projects.

Some of the work of the Civil Defense Organization (White Helmets), which began as an emergency response organization, has shifted to projects aimed at improving living conditions, such as repairing infrastructure, mine clearance and other projects.

In an interview with Enab Baladi in his office in Istanbul, the organization’s director, Raed al-Saleh, explained the reality of this transformation, considering that the projects that fall within the scope of early recovery within the team’s programs are not new but part of of the daily work of the organization.

Inclusion of White Helmets projects as part of early recovery hinges on projects’ ability to deliver what helps people move away from initial aid, Syria program director told Policy Networks Observatory and economics, Karam Shaar.

Talk to Enab Baladithe Syrian professor of economics added that the word “sustainable” was the key word that evaluated the inclusion of the projects within the framework of early recovery.

Recovery requires a safe environment

There is a lot of talk about early recovery projects in Syria. Between the fears that the regime and Russia will exploit these projects and the will of organizations and society to get there, the future vision of this process remains “fuzzy” even in the short term.

In al-Saleh’s opinion, it is still too early to talk about real projects that bring about significant changes within the framework of early recovery.

He added that the “recovery” was supposed to start after the end of the war, as the war and the Syrian regime’s systematic destruction of infrastructure continued in Syria.

Syrians really need a safe environment; hundreds of projects can be carried out to achieve a quick recovery, but they still risk being bombarded by the Syrian regime, al-Saleh said. A safe environment is a fundamental condition for large recovery projects, so that they do not lose their sustainability.

Early Recovery (ER): An approach that responds to recovery needs that arise during the humanitarian phase of an emergency, using humanitarian mechanisms that align with development principles. It allows people to use the benefits of humanitarian action to seize development opportunities, build resilience and establish a sustainable post-crisis recovery process.

United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

During an interview with Enab Baladieconomics researcher from the Omran Center for Strategic Studies, Mohammad al-Abdallah, believed that organizations’ projects in early recovery are linked to local determinants, including providing the enabling environment for the project to put implementation of early recovery interventions, the most important of which is the availability of a secure environment and appropriate local government capacity.

For his part, Prof. Karam Shaar said that the ongoing shelling in northwestern Syria is hampering early recovery plans but does not mean that this process should be postponed.

Shaar explained that areas held by the Syrian Interim Government (SIG) were somewhat safe from shelling. However, there has not been much development in the case of early recovery projects.

Civil Protection Early Recovery Program Tasks

Source: Syrian Civil Defense – 2022

  1. Removal of unexploded ordnance

Number of teams: 6 removal teams, 6 contaminated site clearance teams

4 volunteers were killed as a result of these operations

The teams are responsible for:

  • Get rid of 3000 pieces of ammo;
  • Get rid of 21,000 cluster bombs.
  1. Public services:

Ensure more than 226,000 service operations in 3 years

  1. Location of factories:

1 face mask production plant;

8 powder production plants for fire extinguishers;

2 oxygen production plants;

1 factory for the production of Syrian civil protection clothing.

  1. Raise awareness on:
  • Fire hazards
  • remnants of war
  • Safety and Security

Steps that prepare for the future

The results of a study conducted by the Omran Center for Strategic Studies to assess the “early economic recovery” in northwestern Syria during the second half of 2021 showed the implementation of 766 projects and companies in the governorate of Idlib and the northern and eastern countryside of Aleppo by different organizations, including the Civil Protection in collaboration with the local councils.

Although the number of projects has increased, the significant impact of the “revival” on the region has not been demonstrated. But projects have emerged as milestones that pave the way for future projects.

Raed al-Saleh considered that the current civil protection projects prepare the infrastructure of the organization to be better able to embrace large projects in order to better serve the population in the future.

Omran Center for Strategic Studies economics researcher Mohammad al-Abdallah believes that organizations’ interventions in the early recovery process are still being shaped after years of relief work.

Al-Abdallah pointed out that many organizations have demonstrated their ability to successfully implement a range of interventions in various economic and infrastructure sectors as part of ongoing attempts to build their technical and human capacities to contribute with success in this process.

How has the organization strengthened its capacities?

Since 2019, the White Helmets organization has divided its work into programs, including the early recovery program, to increase the expertise and readiness of its employees, according to al-Saleh, who noted that this has helped the development and the management of these. projects.

The long time that the organization has devoted to carrying out projects in various fields, as well as its daily interaction with the Syrians, has enabled it to continuously develop all its departments, he added.

According to al-Saleh, the volunteerism and membership of many people from different professional and educational backgrounds have also contributed to developing the organization’s action plans and improving the readiness of its infrastructure.

The organization runs training courses throughout the year for all executives so that they are better equipped to handle different levels of projects.

Civil Defense efforts are divided into four main projects, Rescue and Firefighting, Relief and Healthcare, and Early Recovery and Justice.

Al-Saleh said that the organization does not favor one program over another, except in emergency situations where saving lives becomes a priority that pushes Civil Defense to strengthen its efforts in rescue programs, firefighting, rescue and health care.

Economics researcher Mohammad al-Abdallah said the White Helmets have proven themselves in recent years in the field of humanitarian action, particularly in the protection of civilians.

The organization’s interventions were part of the early recovery process and within the framework of interventions related to securing the population.

Obstacles to early recovery

Despite the large number of organizations working on early recovery projects, most people in northwestern Syria still need humanitarian assistance to meet their basic needs due to obstacles and difficulties that hinder the achievement of their goals.

One of the biggest obstacles facing the Civil Defense is the lack of direct funding for early recovery projects in northwestern Syria, said the organization’s director, Raed al-Saleh.

Al-Saleh added that there are fears that the Syrian regime and its Russian ally could exploit early recovery funding for their own interests. The existence of safeguards against exploitation by any entity was a prerequisite for launching early recovery projects in the region, he said.

Al-Saleh explained that Russia was able to manipulate UN terminology to fund the regime’s projects and institutions, prompting Civil Defense to constantly warn UN organizations about the risk of the regime receiving funding from rapid recovery.

Prof. Karam Shaar said that the biggest obstacle to the success of organizations in implementing early recovery projects is the organizational barrier and the inability of organizations to demonstrate their effectiveness to donor countries and institutions.

In Shaar’s opinion, many donors are reluctant to provide support for two reasons. First, they believe that local organizations are not responsible and professional enough.

Second, designated terrorist Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS) who controls Idlib has heightened the organizations’ fears of providing support for early recovery projects, according to Shaar.

In the absence of donor confidence in all but a few organizations, the regions most in need of sustained aid were the least able to access it.

Researcher Mohammad al-Abdallah said that northwestern Syria was preparing to launch early recovery interventions, stressing that they would not be at an advanced level because they were essentially linked to the political component of the Syrian file and in a state of near-conflict. security stability.

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Metabolic Deuterium Imaging Reports on TERT Expression and Early Response to Cancer Treatment | Clinical cancer research https://coberm.net/metabolic-deuterium-imaging-reports-on-tert-expression-and-early-response-to-cancer-treatment-clinical-cancer-research/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 07:57:40 +0000 https://coberm.net/metabolic-deuterium-imaging-reports-on-tert-expression-and-early-response-to-cancer-treatment-clinical-cancer-research/ Objective: Maintenance of telomeres is a hallmark of cancer. Most tumors maintain telomere length via reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression. Identification of clinically translatable imaging biomarkers of TERT may allow noninvasive assessment of tumor proliferation and response to therapy. Experimental design: We used RNAi, doxycycline-inducible expression systems, and pharmacological inhibitors to mechanistically delineate […]]]>

Objective:

Maintenance of telomeres is a hallmark of cancer. Most tumors maintain telomere length via reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression. Identification of clinically translatable imaging biomarkers of TERT may allow noninvasive assessment of tumor proliferation and response to therapy.

Experimental design:

We used RNAi, doxycycline-inducible expression systems, and pharmacological inhibitors to mechanistically delineate the association between TERT and metabolism in preclinical patient-derived tumor models. Deuterium Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (2H-MRS), which is a novel translational metabolic imaging modality, has been used for TERT imaging in tumor-bearing cells and mice live.

Results:

Our results indicate that TERT expression is associated with elevated NADH in several cancers, including glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mechanically, TERT works through the metabolic regulator FOXO1 to upregulate nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase, which is the key enzyme in NAD+ biosynthesis, and the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which converts NAD+ to NADH. Since NADH is essential for the flux of pyruvate to lactate, we show that 2H-MRS based assessment of lactate production [U-2H]-reports of pyruvate on TERT expression in preclinical tumor models live, including clinical field strength (3T). Above all, [U-2H]-pyruvate reports an early response to treatment in mice with patient-derived orthotopic gliomas at early time points before radiographic alterations can be visualized by MRI.

Conclusion :

Elevated NADH is a metabolic consequence of TERT expression in cancer. Above all, [U-2H]-pyruvate reports early response to treatment, before anatomical alterations, providing clinicians with a new tool for assessing tumor burden and response to cancer treatment.

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Ancient DNA Clarifies Ancient History of American Colonial Horses https://coberm.net/ancient-dna-clarifies-ancient-history-of-american-colonial-horses/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 19:29:44 +0000 https://coberm.net/ancient-dna-clarifies-ancient-history-of-american-colonial-horses/ A newly identified 16th century horse specimen is among the oldest domesticated horses in the Americas known to date, and its DNA helps clarify the history of horses in the Western Hemisphere, according to a published study in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Nicolas Delsol of the University of Florida, USA, and colleagues. […]]]>

A newly identified 16th century horse specimen is among the oldest domesticated horses in the Americas known to date, and its DNA helps clarify the history of horses in the Western Hemisphere, according to a published study in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Nicolas Delsol of the University of Florida, USA, and colleagues.

Domestic horses were first introduced to the Americas by Europeans in the late 15th century and became a central part of European industry and military in the Western Hemisphere. Historical records suggest that the first domesticated horses were brought to the Caribbean from the Iberian Peninsula, but there is little archaeological evidence to support this. In this study, researchers present a genetic analysis of a late 16th century horse specimen, shedding light on the origins and spread of American domestic horses.

The specimen is a tooth fragment, originally misidentified as a cow, from the Spanish colonial site of Puerto Real in what is now Haiti. The authors sequenced the mitochondrial genome, not only allowing for correct identification, but also making the first known complete mitogenome of a post-Columbian domestic horse in the Americas.

This horse belongs to a genetic line called Equine Haplogroup A, whose members are well known from southern Europe, supporting the hypothesis that they originated in the Iberian Peninsula. Additionally, this horse’s closest living relatives are the wild ponies of Chincoteague Island, Virginia, which local folk tales say were stranded after a Spanish shipwreck.

Although this study presents only one mitochondrial genome, the authors suggest that the results are significant in several respects. First, this horse’s position within a common Iberian lineage supports documentation of the Iberian Peninsula as the source of many early American domestic horses. Second, the relationships between this horse and others in the Americas will help clarify our understanding of the path horses took when they colonized the Americas.

The authors add, “Our study highlights how ancient DNA can help us understand cultural and historical processes, not only in the distant past, but also in little-studied episodes of more recent history. Analyzing the introduction of European domestic animals (e.g., the horse) to the Americas is such a fascinating but understudied topic. Our results confirm the Iberian origins of these animals, but they also highlight another narrative: the exploration of the mid-Atlantic coast by the Spaniards in the early colonial period.

– This press release was provided by PLOS

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Alameda County awards $4 million in grants to licensed early care and education providers https://coberm.net/alameda-county-awards-4-million-in-grants-to-licensed-early-care-and-education-providers/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 05:14:57 +0000 https://coberm.net/alameda-county-awards-4-million-in-grants-to-licensed-early-care-and-education-providers/ Courtesy of Marin County A new phone number for behavioral health crisis needs will soon be launched nationwide. Instead of dialing 911, people should call 988 to report when someone is in danger of self-harm or suicide. Marin County agencies are educating locals about the new option and when to use it. From July 16, […]]]>

Courtesy of Marin County

A new phone number for behavioral health crisis needs will soon be launched nationwide. Instead of dialing 911, people should call 988 to report when someone is in danger of self-harm or suicide. Marin County agencies are educating locals about the new option and when to use it.

From July 16, 988 is the number to dial or text for urgent help in a mental health or addiction crisis, or even when seeing another person dealing with a behavioral health problem. The Federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) envisions 988 as a first step toward a transformed national crisis care system. The service is a universal entry point to a trained emergency advisor, regardless of the caller’s location. Marin will be among the first counties to launch 988, as other regions across the United States plan to launch later in 2022.

“We hope that calling 988 in a behavioral health crisis will become as natural as calling 911 in a medical or security emergency,” said Dr. Jei Africa, Director of BHRS. “Everyone has a role to play in crisis response and suicide prevention and that’s why we’d like everyone to be aware of this new issue.”

The local Suicide Prevention Lifeline provider is Novato-based Buckelew Programs. Staff who receive 988 calls or texts will quickly assess the emergency and call in trained emergency counselors to provide an appropriate response. Urgent calls requiring in-person mobile crisis response are directed to clinical staff at the Marin County Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and its Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery Services (BHRS).

“Bucklew Programs is proud to lead the transition of 988, providing vital services to residents of Marin,” said Chris Kughn, CEO of Buckelew Programs. “This means better access for those suffering from mental health issues, addictions or suicidal crises. Our trained counselors can provide callers with de-escalation, safety planning, connection to resources, and engagement with mobile and emergency response teams as needed. The hotline assists a person experiencing any level of distress with inclusive, multilingual and culturally appropriate services. 988 aims to understand the caller’s urgent mental health needs and is an alternative to our current emergency response systems.

The creation of the 988 line is an extension of the free 24/7 services and confidential support for callers in emotional distress that have been available since 2005. The federal government has designated the number 988 to operate via the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in 2020 and set to work creating the infrastructure and training counselors fluent in multiple languages ​​to meet the needs of callers. States can now raise money to fund call centers and related mental health crisis services by attaching new fees to phone lines. In California, Assembly Bill (AB) 988 is pending in the state Senate and would help launch the hotline and provide funding to local service providers to handle calls.

The timing of the launch this summer is tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has added stress to many lives. The national suicide rate has climbed nearly 30% since 1999 and is now the second leading cause of death among young people, according to federal sources. About 20% of the American population has a documented mental health problem.

Recently, high-profile acts of violence against innocent people — particularly in the United States and especially with guns — have brought more attention to the need for mental health services. It is estimated that the victims of 25% of all officer-involved shootings are people in mental health crisis. So far, law enforcement agencies across the country have supported the 988 program.

“While our 911 dispatchers will continue to be trained in crisis communications, de-escalation and recognition of people in mental health crisis through our in-house Post-Certified Crisis Response Team training program, we welcome the opportunity to work cohesively with 988 operators,” said Heather Costello. , communications manager for the Marin County Sheriff’s 911 call center. “Cross-system partnerships are critical to the success of 988, as the dedicated phone number will utilize resources from various disciplines, such as mental health, police and fire, depending on the services the person in crisis may need.”

Marin HHS oversees government-funded behavioral health and recovery services locally. More resources are on the BHRS webpage.

If you or someone you know is in mental distress, find resources at Prevention.MarinBHRS.org or contact:

Marin Suicide Prevention Hotline: (415) 499-1100

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1 (800) 273-8255 and en Español: 1 (888) 628-9454

The Trevor Lifeline: 1 (866) 488-7386

Friendship Line (for ages 60 and over): 1 (800) 971-0016

Crisis text line: Text SAILOR to 741741

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Snags plague India’s early warning systems for natural disasters https://coberm.net/snags-plague-indias-early-warning-systems-for-natural-disasters/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/snags-plague-indias-early-warning-systems-for-natural-disasters/ Published on: 07/16/2022 – 10:39 The lack of impact-based forecasts that can identify risks and the lack of localized action plans to follow up on warnings are some of the problems plaguing India’s Early Warning Systems (EWS). IndiaSpend, the country’s first data journalism initiative, along with climate experts say that despite India’s sophisticated early warning […]]]>

Published on:

The lack of impact-based forecasts that can identify risks and the lack of localized action plans to follow up on warnings are some of the problems plaguing India’s Early Warning Systems (EWS).

IndiaSpend, the country’s first data journalism initiative, along with climate experts say that despite India’s sophisticated early warning systems for floods and cyclones, end-to-end connectivity needs to be improved.

This year alone, it is increasingly clear that India is among the most vulnerable countries when it comes to climate change.

Disaster risk reduction

In March, intense heat waves swept across northern and central India, with parts of Delhi recording temperatures reaching 49 degrees Celsius – a first for the city. A total of 15 states were affected.

Assam state in the northeast of the country recorded unprecedented rainfall 327% above normal in May, affecting more than 4.5 million people and killing nearly 180 people.

Elsewhere, a period of intense rains in June triggered flooding of the Brahmaputra and other tributaries.

“Early warning systems have steadily improved in India, and we have saved lives during extreme weather events like cyclones,” Roxy Mathew Koll, a climatologist at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, told RFI.

“We may struggle to cope with very localized events like waterspouts which have now increased due to climate change – forecasting ability is limited here.

“But we can research and map areas prone to downpours and landslides, and take long-term precautions. Early warning systems can save lives, but we also need policies with a long-term vision to save livelihoods.

Early warning systems

Early Warning Systems (EWS) are widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms for preventing disasters worldwide.

According to a study, investing in an SAP to predict cyclones can save six times more by preventing damage. EWS are tools for local, national and regional institutions to manage disaster risk and reduce damage and casualties.

But as disasters continue to affect countries where EWS have already been implemented, it has prompted disaster management systems to think about the direction, architecture and function of warning systems. .

India’s weather early warning system has been effective for tropical cyclones. As a result, the country has seen a substantial drop in the number of deaths over the past two decades.

Mitigating the impact of disasters

“However, the warning system needs to become more robust for other weather events such as thunderstorms, heat waves and heavy rainfall during the monsoon season, for which the weather monitoring system needs to be improved and the Critical alerts should be sent directly to citizens’ mobile phones,” meteorologist and researcher Akshay Deoras told RFI.

Deoras, who has accurately forecasted several high impact weather events including deadly tropical cyclones such as Phailin, Hudhud and Nisarga, says that when an outbreak of a high impact weather event is expected, Doppler weather radars should scan faster than the current rate, which would improve monitoring.

“This information must then be converted into lucid alerts and disseminated immediately in the event of a dangerous outbreak. In addition, a lot of attention should be paid to creating meteorological knowledge among citizens,” adds Deoras.

A recent study of seven vulnerable cities by the Ministry of Interior, USAID, and the UNDP Climate Risk Management Partnership Project highlighted that city institutions were focused on response instead of taking preventative action.

“Technical capacity to understand disaster risk reduction, risk assessment and EWS needs to be strengthened at the level of local urban bodies. City-level hazard and vulnerability mapping capabilities need to be improved as a matter of priority,” the report says.

The report also mentions that technical agencies involved in providing warnings need to evolve and provide information that can be used by a wide range of users or create products based on user needs.

The latest edition of the Global Climate Risk Index published by Germanwatch, an independent development and environmental NGO based in Germany, observed that India was the seventh country in the world most affected by extreme weather events in 2019.

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