Self confidence http://coberm.net/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 22:42:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://coberm.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13-120x120.png Self confidence http://coberm.net/ 32 32 GEM survey reveals gaps in confidence among Scots to start their own business https://coberm.net/gem-survey-reveals-gaps-in-confidence-among-scots-to-start-their-own-business/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 08:32:04 +0000 https://coberm.net/gem-survey-reveals-gaps-in-confidence-among-scots-to-start-their-own-business/ AROUND four in ten adults who are not currently engaged in a business activity in Scotland can see good business opportunities in the next six months, but more than half say fear of failure would stop them, according to a new survey. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Scotland report 2021/22, which captures rates of entrepreneurship […]]]>

AROUND four in ten adults who are not currently engaged in a business activity in Scotland can see good business opportunities in the next six months, but more than half say fear of failure would stop them, according to a new survey.

The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Scotland report 2021/22, which captures rates of entrepreneurship in the general adult population, finds that there are significant gaps in the confidence that Scots have in their entrepreneurial abilities.

The study is part of a global research consortium that measured entrepreneurship rates by surveying around 150,000 adults in 50 countries in 2021, including around 10,000 respondents from the UK’s four home countries.

The report, which gathers the views of over 1,500 Scots who took part in the GEM Adult Population Survey, finds that despite continuing economic hardship, in 2021 almost half a million people in Scotland were engaged in independent entrepreneurial activity. This includes about 170,000 in established businesses (more than three and a half years old) and more than 320,000 in total early-stage entrepreneurial activity (TEA). Around 130,000 women and 60,000 young people between the ages of 18 and 24 took part in a business creation activity.

While Scotland’s TEA rate of 9.5% increased slightly from the 7.3% reported in 2020, this growth was however not statistically significant, meaning that Scotland’s TEA rates remained overall the same in 2021 as in 2020.

Scotland has remained stable amid the pandemic in 2020, but other home countries appear to have built back stronger and achieved significant growth. England (from 7.7% to 11.8%), Wales (from 6.5% to 10.3%) and Northern Ireland (from 5.4% to 9.1%) recorded significant increases in total early-stage entrepreneurial activity in a strong recovery from their 2020 crises.

In Scotland, only around 16% of adult non-entrepreneurs plan to start a start-up in the next three years, the lowest rate among source countries in 2021.

The survey authors suggest that more needs to be done to inspire people to engage in entrepreneurial activity at an early stage and then grow those ventures, with more emphasis on entrepreneurial skills in schools and among contractors.

In 2021, less than four in ten non-entrepreneur adults felt they had the skills, knowledge and experience to start a business, with only around 10% of start-up entrepreneurs and established business owners in Scotland who are expected to create over ten jobs and increase employment by over 50% over the next five years, both below the UK average.

This indicates that compared to the rest of the UK, there are proportionately fewer entrepreneurs in Scotland who expect to make a substantial contribution to the growth of the economy and fewer adults who are confident in their entrepreneurial abilities.

Co-leader of the GEM Scotland study, Dr Sreevas Sahasranamam, Senior Lecturer at the Hunter Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Strathclyde, said: our communities and among active entrepreneurs. Beyond formal courses, the University of Strathclyde has contributed to this effort through initiatives such as Strathclyde Inspire, the Growth Advantage program, the Help to Grow program, as well as working with partners in the industry and the service sector in Scotland and overseas.

All Scottish regions saw nominal TEA growth in 2021, which contributed to the slight increase in national entrepreneurial activity rates.

Male and female TEA rates also saw modest increases in 2021, although the growth in female TEA growth was slightly higher at 2.4 percentage points (5.4% to 7.8%) than that men (9.4% to 11.4%). This means that in 2021 there were nearly 10,000 more women than men engaged in the 2021 growth in start-up activity, which improved the TEA ratio of women to men in Scotland by eleven points compared to to the 57% reported in 2020 to 68% in 2021. This is however still five points below the UK average of 73%.

The gender disparity also varies differently across Scottish regions, with women’s early activity being comparatively lower than men’s in the North East (7.1% vs. 12.5%) and South West regions ( 6.7% versus 11.8%). Female activity is also lower in the east of Scotland (8.6% compared to 10.8%), with parity only observed in the Highlands and the Islands, both at 9.2%.

Dr Samuel Mwaura, from the Hunter Center for Entrepreneurship and co-lead of the GEM Scotland study, said: “Scottish regions have seen TEA rates approaching convergence, mainly due to increased activity women’s entrepreneurship. However, while female start-up activity rates have improved, we would have needed over 60,000 more women engaged in start-up activity in Scotland to approach gender parity in 2021, so there remains much to do to close the gap at the national level and in the regions.

Mark Logan, former COO of Skyscanner and Chief Entrepreneur of the Scottish Government, said: “Entrepreneurship is fundamental to creating the opportunities through which Scots can thrive. Every job that exists today exists because someone, somewhere started something. In this context, the GEM Scotland report clearly highlights the work ahead of us; particularly in normalizing entrepreneurship as a career option, in addressing serious gender imbalances in entrepreneurship, and in the need to encourage broad entrepreneurial education at all ages.

Andrew Harrison, Head of Corporate Banking, NatWest Group, said: “The findings of this report, in the difficult context of the pandemic and the cost of living crisis, show once again that Scotland is a nation of entrepreneurs, with around one in seven Scottish adults now running a business or considering starting one.

“The resilience of small businesses over the past few years is both inspiring and significant. As the economy faces significant headwinds in the year ahead, it is essential that Scotland has a solid foundation on which to build this entrepreneurial boom. As one of the nation’s largest merchant banks, we are committed to playing our part in helping future business success stories start, grow and thrive.

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LEAD builds student confidence in small towns; organizes an exclusive masterclass on leadership and collaboration with tennis legend Leander Paes https://coberm.net/lead-builds-student-confidence-in-small-towns-organizes-an-exclusive-masterclass-on-leadership-and-collaboration-with-tennis-legend-leander-paes/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 18:04:23 +0000 https://coberm.net/lead-builds-student-confidence-in-small-towns-organizes-an-exclusive-masterclass-on-leadership-and-collaboration-with-tennis-legend-leander-paes/ Coimbatore: In line with its aim to provide exposure and confidence-building opportunities that would otherwise not be available to students in small Indian cities, India’s leading school technology company LEAD today announced an exclusive Masterclass on leadership and collaboration with Olympic medalist and legendary tennis player Leander Paes. Leander became a tutor and guide for […]]]>

Coimbatore: In line with its aim to provide exposure and confidence-building opportunities that would otherwise not be available to students in small Indian cities, India’s leading school technology company LEAD today announced an exclusive Masterclass on leadership and collaboration with Olympic medalist and legendary tennis player Leander Paes. Leander became a tutor and guide for students in LEAD-powered schools in over 400 cities and towns in India, as he shared lessons from his own life and career, and delved into the secrets of leadership and of a successful collaboration, two traits that have distinguished him as one of the most successful doubles players in the history of tennis. Commenting on his association with LEAD students, Leander Paes said, “I am delighted to be part of the LEAD Masterclass. Leadership is the right combination of empathy, charisma, communication and problem solving.

In today’s world, schools need to guide students in honing 21st century skills, building confidence such as leadership, collaboration, and communication from an early age, laying a solid foundation for success. in all aspects of life. Sumeet Mehta, said, “Exposure is an important element in building student confidence, according to research conducted by LEAD in collaboration with the Tata Institute of Social Sciences. With Masterclass by LEAD, Level 2+ students in Indian cities now have access to the same exposure and opportunities as their peers in the metros, and can learn the confidence-building skills of the future from renowned experts like Leander Paes. Masterclass is an important part of LEAD’s mission to make great learning accessible and affordable for every child, no matter where they are or where they come from. The LEAD Masterclass is India’s first initiative to provide a holistic learning experience for students in small towns, giving them the opportunity to learn directly from experts and celebrities. Based on individual talent and inclination, LEAD’s Masterclass series encourages these students to dream big and instills in them the confidence to achieve their goals in life. Previous Masterclass sessions have been led by celebrities such as badminton ace Saina Nehwal, tennis champion Sania Mirza and legendary cricketer Sunil Gavaskar. The latest LEAD Masterclass follows the previous edition led by actor-director R. Madhavan, which focused on personality development and building a growth mindset, and was resounding success.

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Prevent digital headwinds from shaking consumer trust https://coberm.net/prevent-digital-headwinds-from-shaking-consumer-trust/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 06:01:23 +0000 https://coberm.net/prevent-digital-headwinds-from-shaking-consumer-trust/ By Prakash PattniManaging Director, Financial Services Digital Transformation, IBM Jhe financial services industry is undergoing major restructuring. Old fixed analog certainties are replaced by nimble and flexible digital alternatives. Unfortunately, the inevitable companion of change is uncertainty, which, in turn, can dislodge trust, the cornerstone on which the financial services industry is built. So how […]]]>

By Prakash PattniManaging Director, Financial Services Digital Transformation, IBM

Jhe financial services industry is undergoing major restructuring. Old fixed analog certainties are replaced by nimble and flexible digital alternatives. Unfortunately, the inevitable companion of change is uncertainty, which, in turn, can dislodge trust, the cornerstone on which the financial services industry is built. So how can the industry implement a massive digital transformation without hurting its relationships with customers and regulators?

At the start of the digital journey, there was an understandable fear of the unknown; from a consumer perspective, we don’t hear much about it anymore from the digital native generation. They are willing to try, unlike older customers, who are still a little wary of some of the new banking services.

We are all becoming digital natives

Of course, from the bank’s perspective, they want everyone to act like a digital native because it would make it a lot easier for them, but a lot of people still like to pick up the phone.

However, for now, providing a range of channels – from fully automated smartphone apps to physical branches – is still necessary, although the resulting transactions are all processed equally behind the scenes. For banks, this means developing and providing services that can evolve to best meet the needs of their customers; over time, this will undoubtedly move away from personal interactions for all but the most complex financial transactions.

We’re not there yet — I think we’re still many years away — but the time will come when the old patterns of interaction finally fade. Not everyone is an early adopter, but people are already changing their behaviors, and that direction will continue. For banks, managing this process will be key to maintaining trust during the transition.

Take a hybrid cloud approach

From the bank’s point of view, everything looks quite different. They realize that things are getting much more complicated than many had first assumed. The “everything in the cloud” approach is becoming more balanced, and so we are seeing a more hybrid approach emerging.

Regulators also acquire new knowledge and therefore they ask much more difficult questions; they’ve seen what can happen when things go wrong, which is helping the transition to hybrid solutions. While consumers may be more confident, banks and regulators are increasingly vigilant about rolling out next-generation digital services.

Take advantage of the benefits of digital

At the heart of the digital transformation of the financial services industry are two drivers: growing customer demand for new types of service delivery and a desire to maximize the revenue opportunities this offers. Large institutions are already seeing a reduction in some of their traditional revenue streams as new market entrants implement embedded finance as part of their offerings.

Banks are therefore turning to the fintech (financial technology) community to help them improve their agility in delivering next-generation services. They also reach out to established partners, such as IBM, for help with automation and ways to safely and efficiently push back some of the new entrants to the market. It is no longer just questions about the cost of infrastructure; it’s about how tools like AI (artificial intelligence) can be successfully deployed to improve customer relationships and build trust in a time of accelerated change.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many physical channels went fully online as banks had to massively expand their mobile and online channels. Banks have seen success with this approach, and this momentum can be maintained if the right approaches and technologies are adopted.

Much of this migration has been made possible by the wireless Internet, which is about to see a major boost with the deployment of 5G infrastructure. Its faster Internet speeds, lower latency and wider bandwidth provide a rich set of self-service features, such as sensors in homes, vehicles and offices, which can create insurance offers in highly personalized real-time. However, harnessing the potential of 5G will require careful thought, as users can remove an unpopular app as easily as any other type of download.

Another technology banks will need to embrace is quantum computing, not only for the exponential processing power it can provide, but also for its ability to enhance security. In a digital banking world, quantum’s ability to detect and deflect cyberattacks before they cause damage will be critical to maintaining trust.

The importance of relationships

Despite all the talk of technology, people still value relationships – some will stay with their bank for 30-40 years. While these relationships build trust over time, it is something that could be damaged or lost in the current evolution of financial services if mistakes are made.

IBM has been around for over 100 years and our technologies have been embedded in banks for about half of that time. But the same basic principles around trust apply; we are a responsible partner with proven and reliable solutions. And above all, we are not looking for the same data as banks: our only role is to provide the solution that the financial services sector needs to compete in an increasingly fragmented digital environment.

Even then, things don’t always go as planned. At IBM, we’re focused on technology – partnering with us gives the financial services industry access to best-in-class. All of this combines to create peace of mind. For example, we are also at the forefront of initiatives such as quantum safe technologies. The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently announced the first quantum-safe cryptography protocol standards for cybersecurity. IBM participated in the development of three of the four encryption methods selected from a set of 69.

Building an environment in which everyone can trust

The skills and expertise required to bring everything together seamlessly in a hybrid environment exist, but in an ever-changing environment, there is always more to come; people keep building and creating new solutions, which can create vulnerabilities. However, the financial services industry must stay one step ahead of bad actors to ensure that trust is maintained for both banks and their customers.

Fortunately, by working with a trusted partner with a proven track record of developing and delivering reliable and scalable solutions, it is possible to meet the varied needs of the global financial services ecosystem. Trust is easily lost, costly and difficult to regain. The right investment today will help ensure that there will not be a disadvantageous trust deficit tomorrow.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Prakash Pattni is Managing Director of Financial Services Digital Transformation at IBM EMEA. Prakash brings financial services experience gained in technology and finance and has led numerous initiatives including public cloud transformation and the implementation of agile product models.

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​Cybersafe Founder Confidence Staveley inducted into Forbes Technology Council – TechEconomy.ng https://coberm.net/cybersafe-founder-confidence-staveley-inducted-into-forbes-technology-council-techeconomy-ng/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/cybersafe-founder-confidence-staveley-inducted-into-forbes-technology-council-techeconomy-ng/ Nigeria digital ICON, Staveley Trustbecame the first Nigerian woman to be inducted into the famed Forbes Technology Council. In a letter communicating the decision to Staveley, Forbes Technology Council founder Scott Gerber said, “We are honored to welcome Confidence Staveley to the community. Our mission with Forbes Technology Councils is to bring together proven leaders […]]]>

Nigeria digital ICON, Staveley Trustbecame the first Nigerian woman to be inducted into the famed Forbes Technology Council.

In a letter communicating the decision to Staveley, Forbes Technology Council founder Scott Gerber said, “We are honored to welcome Confidence Staveley to the community. Our mission with Forbes Technology Councils is to bring together proven leaders from across industries, creating an organized, social capital-driven network that helps each member grow professionally and have an even greater impact in the business world.

In a social media post by Staveley Trust, cybersecurity expert and Founder/Executive Director of the Cybersafe Foundation, appreciated the honor and further explained the process: “I was vetted and selected by a review board based on the depth and diversity from my experience. Acceptance criteria include a track record of successfully impacting business growth metrics, as well as personal and professional accomplishments and honors. »

Staveley, who popularly refers to herself as a “Sissi and also a nerd”, due to her youth and passion for influencing young people in the tech ecosystem, is arguably Africa’s most famous female cybersecurity leader. , the cybersecurity talent developer, global speaker, cybersecurity awareness evangelist, and advocate for inclusion.

She is also an award-winning cybersecurity professional, digital development enthusiast, author, and entrepreneur with over a decade of experience in technology.

She believes that Africans, especially the most vulnerable, should have access to technology and be equipped with cyber risks and mitigation strategies. Confidence has facilitated CyberSafe Foundation’s multiple project collaborations with the UK government.

While hoping that more Nigerian women will be included in the Forbes Technology Council, the Staveley Cybersafe Foundation, through its social media platform @cybersafehq, has recorded tremendous progress in promoting inclusive and safe digital access in Africa, “and we’re thrilled that this membership will help us achieve more.

With Cybersafe Foundation as implementing partner, and in partnership with the UK FCDO and KPMG, Staveley Trust played a major role in launching a cybersecurity toolkit for SMEs in Nigeria. She is also passionate about protecting seniors who are particularly vulnerable to financial scams and identity theft.

Through his organization, Cybersafe Foundation, Staveley recently launched the pan-African cybersecurity awareness tool called The Sabi Toolkit.

This tool provides users with proactive preventative measures and practical steps to stay safe while navigating the digital world. She is also passionate about closing the gender gap in technology through her two initiatives – DigiGirls and CyberGirls.

His induction into the Forbes Technology Council is a great testament to his work and further provides a platform to reach the world with his expertise.

The Council is an invitation-only organization for senior technology executives.

Members of the Forbes Technology Council are respected technology leaders, including CEOs, CIOs, CTOs and others, selected for the Council based on their deep knowledge and diverse industry experience.

According to information on the Council’s website, “Members of our elite business communities receive three pillars of value: Connections, Visibility and Growth.”

Members have the exclusive opportunity to post their expert opinions on Forbes.com. Working with qualified editors, members participate in expert panels and write byline articles to bolster their reputations as thought leaders.

]]> Baku’s confidence, the constructive role of the EU and… Moscow’s jealousy – Aze.Media https://coberm.net/bakus-confidence-the-constructive-role-of-the-eu-and-moscows-jealousy-aze-media/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 17:55:09 +0000 https://coberm.net/bakus-confidence-the-constructive-role-of-the-eu-and-moscows-jealousy-aze-media/ Azerbaijan is moving its agenda forward with confidence, both on the ground and at the negotiating table. The “offensive diplomacy” of President Ilham Aliyev and the actions of the Azerbaijani armed forces are merged into a single strategy, and Armenia has nothing to counter it. The Brussels meeting took place after Lachin and the villages […]]]>

Azerbaijan is moving its agenda forward with confidence, both on the ground and at the negotiating table. The “offensive diplomacy” of President Ilham Aliyev and the actions of the Azerbaijani armed forces are merged into a single strategy, and Armenia has nothing to counter it. The Brussels meeting took place after Lachin and the villages of Zabukh and Sus were returned to Azerbaijani control. Despite recent attempts to revive the format of the Minsk Group, this failing organization is not mentioned at all in the text of the post-meeting statement. Yerevan has once again failed to put the question of the “status of Karabakh” back on the agenda. What was mentioned, however, was the unblocking of communications, the delimitation and demarcation of borders and, above all, the start of concrete work on the text of a peace treaty – based on the five principles proposed by Azerbaijan, which Armenia had been forced to accept.

Finally, the very fact that the European Union, as a mediator, is encouraging work on a peace treaty shows that the capital of united Europe, like Baku, believes that the conflict is already over and that it is time to start building normal relationships and long-term peace.

Pashinyan’s press service tried to sweeten the pill by proudly reporting that “the Nagorno-Karabakh issue” was discussed at the trilateral meeting. However, even the Telegram channels linked to the separatist leaders are forced to admit that “Charles Michel’s statement after the meeting did not mention the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in any way. Furthermore, the statement by the head of the European Council refers to Armenian “detainees”, not “prisoners of war”, essentially using the rhetoric of the Azerbaijani authorities. Translation: another spectacular failure of Armenian diplomacy, certainly not the first, and certainly not the last.

The EU, too, can add the results of the talks to its list of achievements. In his final statement, Michel mentioned the relations of Azerbaijan and Armenia with the EU as one of the topics of the talks. One can hardly speak seriously of Armenia, which is completely dependent on Russia and has already fucked its European partners when it promised to sign an association agreement with the EU in 2013, but then joined the EAEU in the place. Meanwhile, the Azerbaijani President visited Italy after the talks in Brussels, and Bulgaria plans to buy Azerbaijani gas through the new interconnector… In this context, the impressive success of EU mediation does not leave no doubt: the EU is becoming influential in the South Caucasus, and it is entering the region through the Azerbaijani “gate”. The EU confidently assumes mediation on issues such as border demarcation, open communications, etc. principles were once discussed in the EU capital, and details were worked out mainly in Moscow, now Brussels is pushing its mediating role here too.

This fact seems to vex Russia endlessly. Ahead of the Brussels meeting, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova grumbled during a regular briefing: “EU activity in the South Caucasus is shaped by its geopolitical ambitions and, in our opinion, has nothing to do with the real desire to contribute to the normalization of Azerbaijani-Armenian relations. Then she continues: “I would even say that these are pseudo-initiatives of the Europeans. They are more like a cheeky attempt to take credit for mediation, laurels with nothing underneath. We work as mediators, and this work produces concrete results and is valued by the parties. Even more telling is the flurry of publications in the Russian media with eloquent titles like “Karabakh discussed outside Moscow”, “Temptation by Brussels”, etc.

We will refrain from ironies and ask ourselves what “concrete results” Mrs. Zakharova is talking about, if during the year and a half of the stay of Russian blue helmets in Karabakh, the Armenian armed forces were not withdrawn and not had to move after Azerbaijan’s Operation Vengeance. We will not ask why the Zangezur corridor, stipulated in the same trilateral declaration, was not opened (for all the, shall we say, unprecedented influence of Moscow over Yerevan), and why Russia obediently suspended even the demarcation of the border according to General Staff Maps, yielding to the whims of Armenia.

No, what is more remarkable is this. Of course, Zakharova’s irritation and even the Russian media’s obvious green light to reject European mediation in Karabakh can be explained by the strained relations between Russia and the EU, but only in part. Much more important is the “block thinking” once again demonstrated in Smolensk Square. They seem to think that the South Caucasus is a kind of their backyard and they are fully convinced that decisions about who is allowed to participate in political processes in the region and who is not should be made on the banks of the Moskva River. Moreover, for more than a quarter of a century, Karabakh was seen by Moscow as an ideal means to put pressure on both Baku and Yerevan. If the conflict is resolved safely and fully, this means of manipulation will be gone. This will be the reason for the presence of Russian blue helmets. Last but not least, they must be aware that events are unfolding, to put it mildly, in favor of Russia’s favorite outpost, Armenia, which first suffered military defeat and is now suffering a diplomatic defeat.

Whether Russia is trying to “actively torpedo” EU mediation, while acting on behalf of and through Armenia, is another matter. But let’s remember: there were already attempts to play such games in the region after the 44-day war, and it was Armenia that had to pay dearly for its share. Azerbaijan continues to pursue its post-conflict settlement program with confidence. And yes, it’s not just about Brussels.

Nourani

Translated by Minval.Az

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Model-led initiative launched to build children’s confidence – ATV Today https://coberm.net/model-led-initiative-launched-to-build-childrens-confidence-atv-today/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 15:15:42 +0000 https://coberm.net/model-led-initiative-launched-to-build-childrens-confidence-atv-today/ Lionesses Leah Williamson and Beth Mead top a list of female role models for young people. Following their resounding success at the Women’s Euros, the pair took first and second place in the top 20 confidence-building icons, ahead of Harry Potter star Emma Watson and the Duchess of Cambridge. Other models include football stars Lucy […]]]>
Lionesses Leah Williamson and Beth Mead top a list of female role models for young people.

Following their resounding success at the Women’s Euros, the pair took first and second place in the top 20 confidence-building icons, ahead of Harry Potter star Emma Watson and the Duchess of Cambridge. Other models include football stars Lucy Bronze and Alex Scott, as well as Olympian Laura Kenny.

The survey of 1,000 parents, caregivers and guardians of children aged 3-6 also found that 72% believe their young children are, or were, worried about starting school, with 51% of parents also sharing this anxiety.

As a result, 74% are looking for advice to help build their children’s confidence, while 65% of parents are looking for role models for their children.

The research was commissioned to mark the launch of Ultimate Princess Celebration: Time to Shine – a new model-led initiative created by Disney Princess and educational charity The Female Lead. Led by Lioness captain Leah Williamson, the campaign aims to inspire and build confidence in young children as they prepare to start school – and in the early years beyond.

Leah, who led her team to victory at Euro 2022 and made history as the first English women’s football team to win the international title, said:

“The first years at school are exciting. I remember it as a moment when I really started to recognize my love for football and how much I loved playing. Having the confidence to pursue endeavors is at the heart of all Disney Princess stories – so what better way to inspire young girls than by practicing self-confidence and perseverance, they can be anything they want be.

Disney Princess and The Female Lead have also created a series of encouragement videos and assertive mantras featuring the stories of Disney’s Princess characters. Princess Pep speaks address the themes of adventure, confidence and personal potential to prepare children aged 3 to 6 for their first years of school.

They use stories based on qualities such as Tiana’s perseverance and Rapunzel’s bravery, and are told by teenage YouTubers and authors, Kirsten and Aiyven Mbawa, from Northampton. The sisters, who also run Happier Every Chapter, a monthly book subscription service they funded on Kickstarter to promote children’s literacy and diversity, became the charity’s first official young leaders.

Sarah Fox, Vice President of Marketing and Communications, Disney Consumer Products, Games & Publishing EMEA, said:

“We know that the start of school can be an emotional time for parents and children. We hope Ultimate Princess Celebration: Time to Shine and its amazing selection of female role models inspire kids to find the confidence they possess as they begin a new chapter in their own story – just like the Disney Princesses.

Top 10 Trusted Adult Role Models For Kids

  1. Leah Williamson
  2. Beth Mead
  3. Emma Watson
  4. Kate, Duchess of Cambridge
  5. Lucia Bronze
  6. Emma Raducanu
  7. Laura Kenny
  8. sky brown
  9. Alex Scott
  10. Ariana Grande
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Here are the top ten trusted adult role models for kids. https://coberm.net/here-are-the-top-ten-trusted-adult-role-models-for-kids/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 12:48:04 +0000 https://coberm.net/here-are-the-top-ten-trusted-adult-role-models-for-kids/ Lionesses Leah Williamson and Beth Mead top a list of female role models for young people. Following their resounding success at the Women’s Euros, the duo took first and second place in the top 20 confidence-building icons, ahead of Harry Potter star Emma Watson and the Duchess of Cambridge. Building trust is vital The survey […]]]>

Lionesses Leah Williamson and Beth Mead top a list of female role models for young people.

Following their resounding success at the Women’s Euros, the duo took first and second place in the top 20 confidence-building icons, ahead of Harry Potter star Emma Watson and the Duchess of Cambridge.

Building trust is vital

The survey of 1,000 parents, caregivers and guardians of children aged 3-6 also found that 72% believe their young children are, or were, worried about starting school, with 51% of parents also sharing this anxiety.

As a result, 74% are looking for advice to help build their children’s confidence, while 65% of parents are looking for role models for their children.

The research was commissioned to mark the launch of Ultimate Princess Celebration: Time to Shine – a new model-led initiative created by Disney Princess and educational charity The Female Lead.

Led by Lioness Captain Leah Williamson, the campaign aims to inspire and build confidence in young children as they prepare to start school – and in the early years beyond.

self-confidence and perseverance

Leah, who led her team to victory at Euro 2022 and made history by becoming the first English women’s football team to win the international title, said: “The first years at school are exciting.

“I remember it as a moment when I really started to recognize my love for football and how much I loved playing.

“Having the confidence to pursue endeavors is at the heart of all Disney Princess stories – so what better way to inspire young girls than by practicing self-confidence and perseverance, they can be all they are. want to be.”

Disney Princess and The Female Lead have created a series of pep talk and assertive mantra videos featuring the stories of Disney’s Princess characters.

Charity duo pave the way for trust

The Princess Pep speaks cover the themes of adventure, confidence and personal potential to prepare children aged 3 to 6 for their first years of school, using stories based on qualities such as Tiana’s perseverance and the bravery of Rapunzel, as told by teenage YouTubers and authors Kirsten and Aiyven Mbawa, from Northampton.

The sisters, who are published novelists and run Happier Every Chapter, a monthly book subscription service they funded on Kickstarter to promote children’s literacy and diversity, became the first official young leaders of the ‘charity.

Bringing peace to a crushing stage of life

Parenting expert Sue Atkins, who helped co-develop the programme, said: “It is clear that children are going through a crisis of confidence, and our ambition is to help navigate this situation in those who are at the beginning of the first years of education, offering the tools to tackle the problem from the start.

“As children are inspired by role models of confidence and stories of kindness and bravery, I hope this campaign helps them as they enter what can be a crushing stage in life.”

Sarah Fox, Vice President of Marketing and Communications, Disney Consumer Products, Games & Publishing EMEA, said, “We know that back to school can be an emotional time for parents and children.

“We hope Ultimate Princess Celebration: Time to Shine and its incredible selection of female role models will inspire kids to find the confidence they possess as they begin a new chapter in their own story – just like the Disney Princesses.”

Top 10 Trusted Adult Role Models For Kids

  1. Lea Williamson
  2. Beth Mead
  3. Emma Watson
  4. Kate, Duchess of Cambridge
  5. Lucia Bronze
  6. Emma Raducanu
  7. Laura Kenny
  8. sky brown
  9. Alex Scott
  10. Ariana Grande

To watch the new Princess Pep Talks, click here.

To see the Disney Princesses’ assertiveness mantras, go to @DisneyFamilyUK.

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Borrowing costs rise as Sunak warns Britain risks losing investor confidence https://coberm.net/borrowing-costs-rise-as-sunak-warns-britain-risks-losing-investor-confidence/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/borrowing-costs-rise-as-sunak-warns-britain-risks-losing-investor-confidence/ gGovernment borrowing costs rose at the fastest rate in nearly three decades in August, creating a headache for the next prime minister. Yields on short-term UK gilts, which influence government borrowing costs, jumped more than a percentage point last month to 2.8%, the biggest monthly rise since 1994. Borrowing costs rise as investors grow increasingly […]]]>

gGovernment borrowing costs rose at the fastest rate in nearly three decades in August, creating a headache for the next prime minister.

Yields on short-term UK gilts, which influence government borrowing costs, jumped more than a percentage point last month to 2.8%, the biggest monthly rise since 1994.

Borrowing costs rise as investors grow increasingly concerned about Britain’s bleak economic outlook and doubts grow over the ability of Boris Johnson’s successor to handle the growing cost of living crisis .

Goldman Sachs analysts warned this week that inflation could peak at over 22% in Britain if energy costs continue to soar.

Rishi Sunak, the former Chancellor, has warned it would be ‘complacent and irresponsible’ to ignore the risk of financial markets losing confidence in the UK economy

Mr Sunak, who is competing with favorite Liz Truss in the Tory leadership race, told the Financial Times that his rival had made unfunded spending commitments which he said could drive up inflation and interest rates and increase borrowing costs in the UK.

Philip Shaw, chief economist at Investec, told Reuters the nature of the fiscal support Ms Truss is expected to plan as prime minister was a concern for investors.

Ms Truss, the Foreign Secretary, recently hinted at direct support for households as well as tax cuts, which would add to Britain’s still huge borrowing levels after the pandemic.

Government borrowing costs are also rising in Europe as investors brace for more aggressive central bank rate hikes amid an inflation crisis.

The yield on the 10-year German Bund, seen as a barometer of borrowing costs in the eurozone, rose more than 0.7 percentage points in August – the biggest monthly rise since 1990.

Rohan Khanna, strategist at UBS, said UK government borrowing costs are likely to struggle more in the coming months.

He said: “The main risk we see here is that large-scale fiscal measures (rather than targeted and measured) will aggravate already elevated inflationary pressures and trigger an even stronger monetary policy response.

“We expect such a hostile fiscal and monetary mix to raise alarm bells for gilt market participants and trigger further underperformance across markets.”

Mr Khanna expects yields on UK 10-year gilts to rise to 3.25%.

While Goldman said the 22% inflation forecast was not its base case scenario, it warned that the risks to which the UK economy was “tilted to the downside” with a “more severe and prolonged recession “more likely than a quick recovery.

He expects an additional £30billion of government support for households and businesses will not be enough to prevent a ‘mild’ recession, with an increased risk that households will cling to savings in the instead of spending it.

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Specialty Business of the Year in the South West: A solid reputation gives the business the confidence to grow https://coberm.net/specialty-business-of-the-year-in-the-south-west-a-solid-reputation-gives-the-business-the-confidence-to-grow/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://coberm.net/specialty-business-of-the-year-in-the-south-west-a-solid-reputation-gives-the-business-the-confidence-to-grow/ Specialty Business of the Year in the South West: A solid reputation gives the business the confidence to grow | News-Record Engineering This website requires certain cookies to function and uses other cookies to help you have the best experience. By visiting this website, some cookies have already been set, which you can delete and […]]]>



















Specialty Business of the Year in the South West: A solid reputation gives the business the confidence to grow | News-Record Engineering
















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The effect of COVID-19 on public trust in the World Health Organization: a natural experiment in 40 countries | Globalization and health https://coberm.net/the-effect-of-covid-19-on-public-trust-in-the-world-health-organization-a-natural-experiment-in-40-countries-globalization-and-health/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 12:47:29 +0000 https://coberm.net/the-effect-of-covid-19-on-public-trust-in-the-world-health-organization-a-natural-experiment-in-40-countries-globalization-and-health/ The COVID-19 epidemic has infected 274 million people and killed 5.35 million as of December 20, 2021 [1]. The pandemic continues to test the physical and mental health of people with highly transmissible variants of SARS-CoV-2 [2]leading to growing health disparities [3]. It also had a big impact on the economy, increasing both poverty and […]]]>

The COVID-19 epidemic has infected 274 million people and killed 5.35 million as of December 20, 2021 [1]. The pandemic continues to test the physical and mental health of people with highly transmissible variants of SARS-CoV-2 [2]leading to growing health disparities [3]. It also had a big impact on the economy, increasing both poverty and unemployment. [4]. The pandemic is making life more difficult for vulnerable people. The well-being of women especially deserves more attention given the systemic barriers (eg, sexism) to accessing resources and their position as the majority of front-line health care workers [5]. The duration of this pandemic is unprecedented in modern times, causing social unrest around the world.

The World Health Organization (WHO), founded in 1948, was the first United Nations agency devoted to global health affairs. The Constitution of the World Health Organization prescribes the rights and obligations of WHO to assist all peoples in attaining the highest possible level of health [6]. A central and historic duty of the WHO has been the management of the global regime for the control of international public health crises. [7]. The International Health Regulations (IHR) approved in 2005 set out the responsibilities and obligations of WHO and Member States for the prevention of disease, including the defense and control of the international spread of disease and the provision of preventive measures. public health response [8]. Since then, as the “sole source of legally binding international regulations for pandemic response” [9]WHO has played an increasingly important role in preventing the spread of disease between countries, as evidenced by its response to the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus in 2009, poliomyelitis in 2014, Zika in 2014, Ebola in 2014 and 2018 and COVID-19. 19 in 2020 [10].

The IHR, together with other instruments, such as the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (2000), the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework (2011), the Network of Public Health Emergency Operations (2012) and the Emergency Contingency Fund (2015), also assist WHO in strengthening national public health systems [9]. In response to the pandemic, WHO plays a key role in two aspects: sharing the health emergency program and building the health system. The WHO Health Emergencies Program has had a significant impact around the world, playing a greater operational role. The health emergencies program includes the prevention of epidemics and pandemics and the response to health emergencies [11]. Throughout the program, tests, treatments and vaccines can be sourced in a timely manner, essential supplies shipped to countries, and health personnel can be protected and trained. In 2019, WHO responded to 55 emergencies in more than 44 countries and territories [10]. Several pandemics in the past have reminded us of the importance of preparedness, of a strong and shock-resilient health system, and of the need to ensure systems capable of maintaining essential health services without financial hardship, especially in times of of crisis. WHO reiterated its commitment to support countries in achieving universal health coverage. By 2019, 91 countries had improved patient safety and 42 countries had implemented national health workforce accounts [10].

During COVID-19, WHO is providing border support for leadership, policy dialogue and strategic support, as well as technical assistance and service delivery [12]. After the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission reported the cluster of atypical pneumonia cases, WHO set up the Incident Management Support Team on January 1, 2020 to deal with the outbreak. At the IHR Emergency Committee meeting held on January 30, 2020, WHO declared the novel coronavirus outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (USPPI) and helped establish mechanisms national and international emergency coordination. [13]. WHO has taken steps to respond to COVID-19 under a tight budget, such as convening an expert panel to develop interim guidance on best practices for vaccine effectiveness assessments [14]. As of December 31, 2020, 91% of countries had a COVID-19 preparedness and response plan, and 97% had a functioning COVID-19 coordination mechanism [15]. WHO also released the strategic preparedness and response plan to control the spread of the virus and provided technical assistance, including deploying emergency medical teams, establishing a global surveillance system and working with partner laboratories. [15].

Although Article 66 of the WHO Constitution requires legal capacity in the territory of each member [16] and the IHR states that “if a USPPI is declared, WHO shall develop and recommend the essential health measures to be implemented by Member States during such an emergency” [7]these “soft laws” fall short of binding responsibilities [9]and the review board noted that “the RSI has no bite” [17]. Some countries with weaker health systems are unable to follow WHO instructions well [18]. The WHO has also received a lot of criticism, including the irrationality of the WHO occupational health and safety guidelines on COVID-19 [19] and inability to meet the needs of the elderly [20]. Overall review is somewhat unfair [10] given that the failure to control the COVID-19 outbreak in the early stages was caused by ineffective early warning and lack of compliance with States’ obligations under the IHR together [21]. A possible crisis of confidence in the WHO is all the more detrimental as the pandemic poses a threat to vulnerable people and regions. Nevertheless, one can clearly see that the WHO has begun to reshape itself as a coordinator, strategic planner and leader of global health initiatives despite budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful actors. [22].

Only when people trust the WHO will they listen to its advice on pandemic prevention and control and promote global cooperation. It should be noted that trust in social institutions is associated with the adoption of preventive behaviors during the pandemic [23,24,25,26], and health awareness and behaviors are undoubtedly necessary protective measures. A previous study of Americans found that trust in WHO jurisdiction may play an important role in preventive health behaviors in addition to trust in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). United. [27]. Trust in the WHO has been undermined in recent years. In addition to the above, the level of public trust in the WHO is influenced to some extent by the following.

The global political situation has influenced people’s trust in the WHO because the WHO is funded by a combination of wealth and population based membership fees and voluntary contributions. The news that then-President Donald Trump decided to withdraw the United States from the WHO on July 7, 2020 would call into question the WHO’s financial viability and the future of its many advocacy programs. health care and disease control. [28]. Second, the lack of a strong accountability mechanism, which led to states failing to meet IHR obligations, likely caused the WHO to lose confidence. [21]. For example, India refused to cooperate with the WHO to deal with the H5N1 flu in 2007 [29]. This is a clear violation of the IHR’s minimum response requirement and the member’s obligation to cooperate, but there are no punitive measures under the IHR. Finally, increasing or at least maintaining the quality and timeliness of health or crisis management services is crucial to maintaining trust in WHO. A study in Korea demonstrated that improved trust in central and local government is associated with proactive responses to the pandemic crisis, while deteriorating trust in religious organizations is a consequence of their late approach to the pandemic. crisis [30]. Given the important role of the WHO in global health governance, although many efforts have been made, a public health emergency that has not been effectively prevented and controlled, as evidenced by the increase in morbidity and mortality, is likely to lead to a decline in public confidence in WHO.

A longitudinal survey studied the evolution of public trust in institutions during and after the 2009 pandemic in Switzerland and revealed that trust in almost all institutions decreased between the start of the epidemic and one year later. . The magnitude of the decline was particularly high for the WHO and the pharmaceutical industry benefiting from a relatively high initial level of confidence [31]. Although some researchers who analyzed people’s trust in science during the pandemic and found that the overall level of trust in science remained unchanged after the first months of COVID-19 [32]the reliability of sources of information about COVID-19, such as mainstream media, state health departments, the CDC, the White House and a well-known university, has declined significantly in the United States [33]. However, given the importance of the WHO during this pandemic, the effect of COVID-19 on public trust in the WHO has not yet been well explored.

In this study, we used COVID-19 as a natural experiment to examine whether this pandemic caused a crisis of confidence in the WHO. To be more specific, we adopted a difference-in-differences (DID) method that compounded the variations in trust over time and space during COVID-19 to estimate the influence of COVID-19 on trust. of the public in the WHO. This may have implications for the far-reaching effect of the public health emergency on people’s beliefs, including trust in major international organisations. It can also illuminate the high priority WHO and other international organizations should place on global development, establishing and maintaining public credibility in the face of emergencies, and confidently preventing crises.

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